e-news: September 10, 2020

An updated Union Directory listing union goods and services in R.I. can be found on our website at www.RhodeIslandAFLCIO.org under the “Resources” tab.

Here is the direct link—-> Union Directory

Please use this directory to find where you can buy union and use services in Rhode Island


R.I. History’s People Museum: An interview with RI AFL-CIO President George Nee

Watch video here.


Watch video here.


Providence Journal: Providence Teachers Union protests district’s reopening plan

PROVIDENCE — Members of the Providence Teachers Union say they are concerned about returning to school next week in buildings they say have been unsafe and unclean since long before the start of the coronavirus pandemic.

“We’ve said for years that the schools aren’t as clean as they should be,” Maribeth Calabro, president of the teachers union, said during a protest staged by the group outside the State House on Tuesday. “If the expectation is that we’re going to be in school, then the expectation should be that we’re going to have clean schools with good ventilation.”

Elementary school students in Providence Public Schools will begin returning to school, on a staggered schedule, on Monday. The return of older students will be phased in through Oct. 13, according to School Department spokeswoman Laura Hart.

Calabro said the union is concerned about risks of returning to schools that have long been plagued with infrastructure issues. Teachers have complained of classroom windows that don’t open, rodent feces on classroom floors, grimy desks, undrinkable water coming from bubblers and leaking ceiling tiles, she said. Read more here.



AFL-CIO: Am I Safe at Work?

Far too many employers are putting the lives of working people at risk. We are being asked to work without the adequate protections and protocols that help keep us safe from becoming infected with COVID-19.

Find out if your employer is doing enough to keep you and your co-workers safe. See website here.


Gallup: At 65%, Approval of Labor Unions in U.S. Remains High

WASHINGTON, D.C. — As Labor Day approaches and economic conditions in the U.S. remain tenuous, Americans’ 65% approval of labor unions is once again the highest it has been since 2003. Public support for labor unions has been generally rising since hitting its lowest point of 48% in 2009, during the Great Recession.

Gallup’s initial reading of the public’s support for labor unions was 72% in 1936, at the advent of the modern U.S. organized labor movement, and approval peaked at 75% in 1953 and 1957. The lowest ratings to date have been recorded during particularly weak economic times. This includes the late 1970s and early to mid-1980s — when support fell below 60% for the first time — and 2009 through 2012, when it hovered around 50%.

While the latest reading, from a July 30-Aug. 12 poll, comes at a time of severe economic upheaval, this has so far not had a negative impact on the public’s view of unions, as it is little changed from last year’s reading.

Read more here.


Parade: 10 Fascinating Things You Probably Didn’t Know About the History of Labor Day and the Labor Movement

There’s more to Labor Day than what often seems to only amount to the final barbecues and three-day weekends of summer. The federal holiday, celebrated the first Monday in September, marks a major win for American workers. Learn about the history of Labor Day and why it deserves recognition beyond burgers and sales.

10 Facts About the History of Labor Day and the Labor Movement

1. The first Labor Day “parade” was actually a strike.

On Sept. 5, 1882, tens of thousands of union laborers marched from New York City Hall to Union Square to protest deplorable working conditions amid the Industrial Revolution: Workers, including children as young as five years old, labored in unsafe factories, farms, mills and mines for 12 hours or more per day, seven days a week, often without breaks, fresh air or even clean water. Many workers risked their jobs and livelihoods in order to march.

Learn more here.


Labor 411: Keeping your Home, Work and School Space Spic and Span

For so many of us during this pandemic, our home is doubling as a work space while also serving as our children’s classroom. That means it needs to be clean. You have choices when you tidy up, and Labor 411 encourages the use of products made by union-friendly companies that treat their workers fairly and give them a voice on the job. So before that work/school/home day begins, get your house in order, and let’s all clean our way to a stronger America. See list here.

**Remember to buy your union-made food and beverages at Shaws, Stop & Shop and Eastside Marketplace to support our brothers and sisters who work there.


UPCOMING EVENT:

Basic/Advanced Steward Training Virtual Workshop via ZOOM

The Institute for Labor Studies and Research is offering a Basic/Advanced Steward Training Virtual Workshop via ZOOM consisting of 2 sessions.

Tuesday, September 22 @ 5:00 – 8:00 p.m.

Tuesday, September 29 @ 5:00 – 8:00 p.m.

Seating is limited and on a first come first serve basis.

If you are interested in attending the Steward Training Virtual Workshop, please reply by Friday, September 11, 2020 directly to Denise Cesino at 401-463-9900 or dcesino@riilsr.org.For more information visit Website.


CORONAVIRUS COVID-19 RESOURCES

You can find some helpful resources on our website.

Share this link: https://rhodeislandaflcio.org/coronavirus-covid-19


Are you following Rhode Island AFL-CIO on Social Media? Click on the links below.

FaceBook: @riaflcio

Twitter: @riaflcio

Visit our website RhodeIslandAFLCIO.org for more information, news and events.


This week on Labor Vision

The Labor Vision at Home Edition continues. Check out the latest episodes on our website: www.LaborVisionRI.org.

Upcoming Segment:

▪ International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees(IATSE) Rally For The Heroes Act

Never miss a segment. Like us on Facebook (@LaborVisionRI), follow us on Instagram and Twitter, and subscribe to our YouTube page (LaborVisionTV1).


Cox Channel 14 & FIOS Channel 33
Tuesday @ 7pm
Thursday @ 8pm
Saturday @ 5pm
                               
More Info on Labor Vision:                                    
Website: http://www.LaborVisionRI.org                          
FaceBook: @LaborVisionRI                                                    
Twitter: @LaborVisionRI                                                        
Instagram: LaborVisionRI
YouTube: LaborVisionTV1

e-news: september 3, 2020

An updated Union Directory listing union goods and services in R.I. can be found on our website at www.RhodeIslandAFLCIO.org under the “Resources” tab.

Here is the direct link—-> Union Directory

Please use this directory to find where you can buy union and use services in Rhode Island


Inspections, or walkthroughs? Raimondo and teachers union disagree on her pledge to schools

PROVIDENCE — One of the state’s two teachers unions locked horns with Gov. Gina Raimondo on Wednesday, calling state “walk-throughs” of school buildings inadequate.

In a tweet shortly before Raimondo’s daily briefing on school reopenings, the National Education Association Rhode Island said inspectors were not visiting every classroom, that local school committees were not invited to participate, and, in at least one district, the entire tour lasted two hours.

“In one district, [the inspection team] said show us your best and worst schools,” said NEARI Executive Director Bob Walsh. “The point was in every district that wanted to reopen classrooms, the final piece of the puzzle was a room-by-room approval so that everyone was comfortable.

“We are trying to do this cooperatively,” he said. “This is the frustration.”

The recommendation for inspections came from NEARI President Larry Purtill.

Read more here.



See pictures here.



See pictures here.


IATSE, Local 23 FaceBook:


Providence Journal: Stung by pandemic, R.I. performing arts workers plead for help from Congress

PROVIDENCE — Hundreds of members of the union representing Rhode Island entertainment professionals marched from the Providence Performing Arts Center to the Dunkin’ Donuts Center on Tuesday night to call on Congress to act on multiple measures that would help revive their industry.

The crowd included lighting designers, audio technicians, exhibit builders, stage hands and other skilled professionals who are normally employed by theaters, concert halls and performance venues to help put on live shows, but have been out of work since pandemic-related lockdowns caused the cancellation of nearly all live entertainment across the nation.

“We are just so desperate to get back to work,” said Scott Mccausland, a 52-year-old audio technician. “We are trying to do everything that we can to bring attention to our cause and see if we can’t get ourselves back to work. This is our livelihood.”

The demonstrators called on Congress to pass the Save Our Stages Act, which would authorize the Small Business Administration to issue grants of up to $12 million to live-venue operators and other representatives of the entertainment industry, as well as the RESTART Act, which would extend the Paycheck Protection Program that guarantees loans to small businesses to help pay their employees. Read more here.


Providence Performing Arts Center:

More info and take action here.




ILSR August Newsletter:

View larger and read more here.


AFL-CIO Reacts to Police Shooting of Jacob Blake

Statement from AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka:

The labor movement joins with all those in Kenosha, Wisconsin, and across the country who are nonviolently demanding an end to systemic racial injustice after the shooting of Jacob Blake. Despite months of protest and the outpouring of heartfelt demands for change, incidents like these remain all too common and they shock our collective conscience. Actions that cheapen the lives of Black people and the service of good officers must be called out. As Americans, we must recognize the difference between right and wrong, and we must always stand up for what is right.

Statement from the AFL-CIO Task Force on Racial Justice:

We are outraged at the shooting of Jacob Blake by a police officer in Kenosha, Wisconsin. We pray for his full recovery and for his loved ones.

As details continue to come in, we cannot escape the images of a Black man being shot in the back in front of his children. What happened to Mr. Blake only strengthens our resolve to make sure Black Lives Matter in words and in deeds so we can heal our communities and our country. This is precisely why the AFL-CIO created the Task Force on Racial Justice and why we formed a subcommittee on policing. Read more here.


Buzz Feed: Postal Workers On Reddit Are Revealing The Things They Wish Customers Knew, And It’s So Important

By now, you’ve probably heard that the United States Postal Service is in crisis. The service is in desperate need of funding — which President Trump has opposed in an open attempt to suppress mail-in voting. And the new Postmaster General, Louis DeJoy, recently came under fire for announcing big cuts to the USPS, which many believe he did at the request of the Trump administration.

In response to major backlash for making these changes so close to an election, DeJoy has said he will delay the cuts for now. As you can imagine, all of this makes it a tough time to be an employee for the USPS. So last week, a viral Reddit thread asked postal workers: “What do you need right now? How can we brighten your day when we see you on our routes?”

The conversation garnered thousands of responses from USPS workers all across the nation, both former and present. Here are some of the top-voted suggestions: See list here.



UPCOMING EVENTS:

RICOSH / RI AFL-CIO ZOOM Workship: Heat Illness and Staying Healthy in the Heat

Today, September 3rd at 3 p.m.

Climate change is already making extreme heat waves more likely and even hotter.  815 workers perished in the United States 1992 through 2017 from heat-related illness. Solutions to heat stress are well-known: constant water/liquid intake, rest in a shaded or climate-controlled location, among other measures. It is important that workers and employers recognize heat’s hazards and what works to minimize these hazards.

Register in advance for this meeting here.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

###

###

Basic/Advanced Steward Training Virtual Workshop via ZOOM

The Institute for Labor Studies and Research is offering a Basic/Advanced Steward Training Virtual Workshop via ZOOM consisting of 2 sessions.

Tuesday, September 22 @ 5:00 – 8:00 p.m.

Tuesday, September 29 @ 5:00 – 8:00 p.m.

Seating is limited and on a first come first serve basis.

If you are interested in attending the Steward Training Virtual Workshop, please reply by Friday, September 11, 2020 directly to Denise Cesino at 401-463-9900 or dcesino@riilsr.org.



For more information visit Website.


CORONAVIRUS COVID-19 RESOURCES

You can find some helpful resources on our website.

Share this link: https://rhodeislandaflcio.org/coronavirus-covid-19


Are you following Rhode Island AFL-CIO on Social Media? Click on the links below.

FaceBook: @riaflcio

Twitter: @riaflcio

Visit our website RhodeIslandAFLCIO.org for more information, news and events.



THIS WEEK IN LABOR HISTORY

Voices in Labor:

Walter Reuther was born. Reuther was president of the United Auto Workers from 1946 until his death in 1970 under suspicious circumstances. He was also president of the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO) prior to its merger with the American Federation of Labor (AFL). Reuther was a supporter of political action and once said “There’s a direct relationship between the bread box and the ballot box, and what the union fights for and wins at the bargaining table can be taken away in the legislative halls.” – 1907

A 3-week strike in Woonsocket, Rhode Island, part of a national movement to obtain a minimum wage for textile workers, resulted in the deaths of three workers. Ultimately more than 420,000 workers struck nationally. – 1934

Union delegates from New York, Boston, Philadelphia and other East Coast cities met in a convention to form the National Trades’ Union, which united craft unions to oppose “the most unequal and unjustifiable distribution of the wealth of society in the hands of a few individuals”. The union faded after a few years but paved the way for more than 60 new unions. – 1834

Learn more


Now showing on Labor Vision

The Labor Vision at Home Edition continues. Check out the latest episodes on our website: www.LaborVisionRI.org.

Never miss a segment. Like us on Facebook (@LaborVisionRI), follow us on Instagram and Twitter, and subscribe to our YouTube page (LaborVisionTV1).


Cox Channel 14 & FIOS Channel 33
Tuesday @ 7pm
Thursday @ 8pm
Saturday @ 5pm
                               
More Info on Labor Vision:                                    
Website: http://www.LaborVisionRI.org                          
FaceBook: @LaborVisionRI                                                    
Twitter: @LaborVisionRI                                                        
Instagram: LaborVisionRI
YouTube: LaborVisionTV1

e-news: August 27, 2020

An updated Union Directory listing union goods and services in R.I. can be found on our website at www.RhodeIslandAFLCIO.org under the “Resources” tab.

Here is the direct link—-> Union Directory

Please use this directory to find where you can buy union and use services in Rhode Island



WPRI Channel 12 News: Postal workers protest in Providence amid concerns over cutbacks, late deliveries

PROVIDENCE, R.I. (WPRI) — Postal workers gathered outside of the Main Post Office in Providence Tuesday morning, but not to deliver mail.

Instead, members of Rhode Island’s Federal Delegation and postal workers joined together against recent changes made to the mail service by Postmaster General Louis DeJoy. This comes one day after DeJoy sat before the House Committee.

Following legislation passed by the house over the weekend, Reed and Whitehouse are calling on the Senate Majority leader to take up a vote to fund the Postal Service with $15 billion.

Just last week, the delegation was at this very same post office sharing stories of constituents who are not receiving medication, paychecks, or bills on time.

Read more and watch video here.


Watch Video


IAFF: New Law Protects Rhode Island Members Disabled by Cancer

Following the successful lobbying efforts by the Rhode Island State Association of Fire Fighters (RISAFF), state legislators have passed a law guaranteeing cancer as an occupational illness and providing accidental disability benefits to fire fighters who can no longer work due to cancer complications.

“Our Rhode Island State Association of Fire Fighters team did an incredible job fighting to pass this law to protect our members with cancer,” says General President Harold Schaitberger. “It is one of the best presumptive laws I have seen to date.”

“On the job, our members are exposed to cancer-causing agents every day. This law takes the burden of proving exactly which call caused their cancer,” says RISAFF President Joe Andriole. “I want to especially thank RISAFF lobbyist Paul Valetta for successfully guiding the legislation through the General Assembly to secure this benefit for our members who need it.”

If a fire fighter is diagnosed with a cancer but is expected to be treated and return to work, he or she is covered with full pay and benefits. However, if a fire fighter is unable to return to work due to complications from cancer, he or she can apply for accidental disability benefits through the pension system. Read more here.



RICOSH: National COSH statement on the U.S. DOL’s Office of Inspector General report on whistleblower complaints

August 20, 2020  

Contact: Roger Kerson @ Roger@nationalcosh.org, 734.645.0535

Whistleblower Complaints Skyrocket During COVID-19 as Inspector General warns of delays and calls for faster investigations

“OSHA was challenged to complete investigations in a timely manner before the pandemic and the potential exists for even greater delays now,” states an investigative report from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Inspector General (OIG)*. “As COVID-19 illnesses and deaths continue to rise, OSHA needs to act quickly to investigate whistleblower complaints, so employees feel protected when reporting unsafe working conditions.”

According to the August 14 OIG report, OSHA received more than 4,100 complaints of illegal retaliation against whistleblowers during the first four months of the COVID-19 pandemic, from February 1, 2020 through May 31, 2020. This is a 30 percent increase compared to complaints received during the same four-month period in 2019.

Read more here.


IATSE Local 23 is going to LIGHT PROVIDENCE RED

#WeMakeEvents #RedAlertRESTART and #ExtendPUA represent a major call to action on Tuesday, September 1, 2020, imploring the US Congress to pass the RESTART Act (S.3814) as quickly as possible, offering economic relief to the Live Events Industry, which has been shuttered since March 2020, putting millions of people out of work. Additionally, the movement is to support ExtendPUA.org in their efforts towards continuation and extension of the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance to provide relief to those without work due to COVID-19.

The new date is September 1, 2020, when buildings, structures, and residences will be lit in red from 9 pm – 12 am (local time in each market) as the event rolls across North America. The goal to raise public awareness that the Live Events Industry is on Red Alert for its very survival, and create congressional pressure to act now.

As theaters, concert tours, festivals, opera houses, trade shows, and other live events as well as film and television production remain closed, or open on a very limited basis, the entire industry is impacted, from designers, technicians, programmers, and stagehands to rental shops, manufacturers, and distributors of entertainment technology. The first industry to close last March, Live Events could be the last sector to re-open due to the COVID-19 crisis.

More info on Website here.


Economic Policy Institute: Union workers are paid 11.2% more and have greater access to health insurance and paid sick days than their nonunion counterparts

Policymakers must strengthen workers’ ability to form unions, particularly during the coronavirus crisis

A new report by the Economic Policy Institute discusses the importance of unions and workers’ collective action in establishing an equitable economy, particularly during the coronavirus pandemic.

The authors find that unionized workers earn on average 11.2% more in wages than nonunionized peers (workers in the same industry and occupation with similar education and experience). Unionized Black workers are paid 13.7% more than their nonunionized peers, while unionized Hispanic workers are paid 20.1% more than their nonunionized peers. White workers represented by union are paid 8.7% more than their nonunionized peers. Additionally, 94% of workers covered by a union contract have access to employer-sponsored health benefits, compared with just 68% of nonunion workers and 91% of workers covered by a union contract have access to paid sick days, compared with 73% of nonunion workers.

However, in 2019, only 1 in 9 U.S. workers were covered by a union contract, while 48% of all nonunion workers who say they would vote for a union if given the opportunity.

Read more here.


Labor 411: Union-made back to school shopping list

When we think of end of summer and “back to school,” most of us flash to days gone by when our young scholars actually left the house – backpacks stuffed with new supplies – to go back to their physical classroom. For the time being, that won’t be possible for most of us, and our sons and daughters will be pursuing their education from the comfort of home. Still, that doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t be loading up on notebooks, art supplies and the other items that, even from home, they will need to stay prepared and organized. We’ve thrown in a couple of sanitary items because things like tissues are especially important now. The products listed below are made by companies that treat their workers fairly and give them a voice on the job.

Study hard, stay healthy and let’s all work together to build a stronger America.

See shopping list here.



UPCOMING EVENTS:

RICOSH / RI AFL-CIO ZOOM Workship: Heat Illness and Staying Healthy in the Heat

Thursday, September 3rd at 3 p.m.

Climate change is already making extreme heat waves more likely and even hotter.  815 workers perished in the United States 1992 through 2017 from heat-related illness. Solutions to heat stress are well-known: constant water/liquid intake, rest in a shaded or climate-controlled location, among other measures. It is important that workers and employers recognize heat’s hazards and what works to minimize these hazards.

Register in advance for this meeting here.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Basic/Advanced Steward Training Virtual Workshop via ZOOM

The Institute for Labor Studies and Research is offering a Basic/Advanced Steward Training Virtual Workshop via ZOOM consisting of 2 sessions.

Tuesday, September 22 @ 5:00 – 8:00 p.m.

Tuesday, September 29 @ 5:00 – 8:00 p.m.

Seating is limited and on a first come first serve basis.

If you are interested in attending the Steward Training Virtual Workshop, please reply by Friday, September 11, 2020 directly to Denise Cesino at 401-463-9900 or dcesino@riilsr.org.



For more information visit Website.


CORONAVIRUS COVID-19 RESOURCES

You can find some helpful resources on our website.

Share this link: https://rhodeislandaflcio.org/coronavirus-covid-19


Are you following Rhode Island AFL-CIO on Social Media? Click on the links below.

FaceBook: @riaflcio

Twitter: @riaflcio

Visit our website RhodeIslandAFLCIO.org for more information, news and events.



THIS WEEK IN LABOR HISTORY

Voices in Labor:

Joyce Miller, Vice President of the Amalgamated Clothing & Textile Workers, became the first woman to sit on the AFL-CIO Executive Council. She was also the co-founder and longtime president of the Coalition of Labor Union Women (CLUW). – 1980

The International Longshore & Warehouse Union was granted a charter by the AFL-CIO. – 1988

The Mechanics Gazette, believed to be the first U.S. labor newspaper, was published in Philadelphia, the outgrowth of a strike by carpenters demanding a shorter, 10-hour day. The strike lost but labor journalism blossomed: within five years there were 68 labor newspapers across the country, many of them dailies. – 1827

The National Association of Letter Carriers formed. – 1889

Learn more


Now showing on Labor Vision

The Labor Vision at Home Edition continues. Check out the latest episodes on our website: www.LaborVisionRI.org.

Never miss a segment. Like us on Facebook (@LaborVisionRI), follow us on Instagram and Twitter, and subscribe to our YouTube page (LaborVisionTV1).


Cox Channel 14 & FIOS Channel 33
Tuesday @ 7pm
Thursday @ 8pm
Saturday @ 5pm
                               
More Info on Labor Vision:                                    
Website: http://www.LaborVisionRI.org                          
FaceBook: @LaborVisionRI                                                    
Twitter: @LaborVisionRI                                                        
Instagram: LaborVisionRI
YouTube: LaborVisionTV1

e-news: august 20, 2020

An updated Union Directory listing union goods and services in R.I. can be found on our website at www.RhodeIslandAFLCIO.org under the “Resources” tab.

Here is the direct link—-> Union Directory

Please use this directory to find where you can buy union and use services in Rhode Island.



WJAR Channel 10 News: Teacher unions in Rhode Island call for a remote start to the school year

PROVIDENCE, R.I. (WJAR) —Rhode Island’s largest teachers union is calling for a remote start to the school year, and criticizing Governor Gina Raimondo for her push to get students back in the classroom.

“I don’t get it. The governor is one of the smartest people I know. I don’t get what she’s seeing that the educators aren’t,” NEA Rhode Island Executive Director Robert Walsh told NBC 10 News Thursday.

“We’re all saying the same thing. Start with distance learning. It’s not that hard. She’s not listening right now. We encourage her to listen,” Walsh said.

Raimondo has made clear she wants kids back in the classroom, and claims that won’t happen until it’s safe.

But teachers unions are increasingly voicing concerns over safety, especially now about air quality and ventilation in old schools.

The Providence Teachers Union is also calling for distance learning to start the school year, mostly because of concerns over ventilation.

Read more here.


WJAR Channel 10 News: Some RI classrooms don’t meet CDC recommendations to prevent COVID-19 spread

Air quality has become the latest concern for school districts, as Rhode Island debates whether to send students back to class.

The layout and design of a school building can impact the spread of COVID-19. The virus can infect people through respiratory droplets circulating in the air, which means a building’s heating, ventilation and HVAC system can play a major role in stopping the infection from spreading through particles.

Coventry Superintendent Craig Levis says air quality has become the latest barrier in reopening plans.

“I’m very concerned about air quality and ventilation. We have many classroom spaces that as of right now, we should not be putting kids in those,” he said.

Some buildings, like hospitals, have filters designed to remove these particles from the air, but NBC 10 learned the standard school building does not.

Many Rhode Island classrooms do not meet CDC recommendations to prevent the spread of COVID-19, which include increasing circulation of outdoor air, installing fans, and upgrading ventilation and filtration systems. Read more here.


AFL_CIO: Trumka to DNC Labor Council: Our Democracy Is at Stake

AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka delivered the following remarks at the 2020 Democratic National Convention Labor Council Meeting:

I want to thank my longtime friend, Brother Stuart [Appelbaum], for that introduction. And I want to thank Chairman [Tom] Perez, for his great leadership.

As we convene this meeting of the Labor Council, as we begin four days of a Democratic convention unlike any other, working people are counting on us more than ever because working people are doing more for us than ever. Right now, in big cities and small towns, union members are on the job. A pandemic is not stopping us from lifting the loads, stocking the shelves and fighting the fires. From healing the suffering and teaching our children. And while many of us are joining this meeting and watching this convention from the comfort of our homes, too many working people are wondering if they will be able to keep their home or make next month’s rent. They are choosing between groceries and prescriptions. Millions are out of work through no fault of their own. As travel halts. And shows stop. And our economy grinds to a halt.

These workers did their job and they did it well, but our president refused to do his. Donald Trump did not create the coronavirus, but his utter incompetence, his inaction and his lack of basic compassion have made COVID-19 worse. Instead of pouring himself into a national response plan, the president is pouring gasoline on the fire!

Read more here.





The Conversation: COVID-19 is hitting tipped workers hard

Even prior to COVID-19, tipped workers suffered from the inadequacies of the United States’ social safety net and minimum wage standards.

The pandemic has exposed not only the inherent vulnerability of food service workers to a public health emergency but also how even government efforts to support them can fail those who rely on tips for some or most of their income.

As a postdoctoral fellow studying the health implications of precarious employment, including tipped-service work, I believe that there needs to be more help for tipped workers in order for them to survive the pandemic and whatever comes after.

Sick at work

Well before the first case of the coronavirus emerged on U.S. soil, food service jobs were among the 25 lowest-paid occupations in the country.

As cases began to crop up, initial public health guidance for workers included advising them to work from home and stay home when sick.

Read more here.


Voice of Labor:


UPCOMING EVENTS:

Register here

Basic/Advanced Steward Training Virtual Workshop via ZOOM

The Institute for Labor Studies and Research is offering a Basic/Advanced Steward Training Virtual Workshop via ZOOM consisting of 2 sessions.

Tuesday, September 22 @ 5:00 – 8:00 p.m.

Tuesday, September 29 @ 5:00 – 8:00 p.m.

Seating is limited and on a first come first serve basis.

If you are interested in attending the Steward Training Virtual Workshop, please reply by Friday, September 11, 2020 directly to Denise Cesino at 401-463-9900 or dcesino@riilsr.org.



For more information visit Website.


CORONAVIRUS COVID-19 RESOURCES

You can find some helpful resources on our website.

Share this link: https://rhodeislandaflcio.org/coronavirus-covid-19


Are you following Rhode Island AFL-CIO on Social Media? Click on the links below.

FaceBook: @riaflcio

Twitter: @riaflcio

Visit our website RhodeIslandAFLCIO.org for more information, news and events.



THIS WEEK IN LABOR HISTORY

Voices in Labor:

William George Meany was born on this date. Meany was a labor leader for 57 years. He was the key figure in the creation of the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO), and served as its first president from 1955-1979. Meany’s father was a union plumber, and George also became a plumber at an early age. He became a full-time union official twelve years later. As an officer of the American Federation of Labor, he represented the AFL on the National War Labor Board during World War II. He served as president of the AFL from 1952 to 1955. He proposed its merger with the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO) in 1952, and led the negotiations until the merger was completed in 1955. He then served as president of the combined AFL-CIO for the next 24 years. Meany had a reputation for integrity and opposition to corruption in the labor movement, as well as uncompromising anti-communism. In his official biography, George Meany and His Times, he said he had “never walked a picket line in his life.” – 1894

This day marked the founding of the American Federation of Government Employees, following a decision by the National Federation of Federal Employees (later to become part of the International Association of Machinists) to leave the AFL. – 1932

The National Agricultural Workers Union merged into Amalgamated Meat Cutters & Butcher Workmen. – 1960

Learn more


Now showing on Labor Vision

The Labor Vision at Home Edition continues. Check out the latest episodes on our website: www.LaborVisionRI.org.

Never miss a segment. Like us on Facebook (@LaborVisionRI), follow us on Instagram and Twitter, and subscribe to our YouTube page (LaborVisionTV1).


Cox Channel 14 & FIOS Channel 33
Tuesday @ 7pm
Thursday @ 8pm
Saturday @ 5pm
                               
More Info on Labor Vision:                                    
Website: http://www.LaborVisionRI.org                          
FaceBook: @LaborVisionRI                                                    
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E-news: August 13, 2020

An updated Union Directory listing union goods and services in R.I. can be found on our website at www.RhodeIslandAFLCIO.org under the “Resources” tab.

Here is the direct link—-> Union Directory

Please use this directory to find where you can buy union and use services in Rhode Island.


NEARI / RIFTHP: Joint Letter sent to the Governor, RIDE & RIDOH

NEARI and Rhode Island Federation of Teachers & Health Professionals, in a joint letter sent Friday, called on the governor, RIDE, & RIDOH to begin the school year with distance learning. And that should start no earlier than September 9 to allow the necessary preparation for distance learning to be successful.

Additionally: NEARI and RIFTHP educators and support professionals cannot return to unsafe school buildings for face-to-face instruction until districts and the state can meet these 8 necessary criteria to protect all students, families, and educators:

1. A statewide Covid-19 R-value that indicates the virus is under control and will stop spreading
2. Rapid testing and response are proven and widely accessible
3. Successful air quality inspections of every classroom and workspace prior to school opening as required by law and regulation
4. Masks required for all students, staff, and visitors
5. Social distancing and desks spaced at least six feet apart
6. True stable groups of 15 in alignment with current RI social gathering requirements
7. Health precautions such as daily temperature checks for students, staff, and visitors
8. An adequate and safe means of transportation for all students entering and leaving our schools as required

Watch the press conference carried live earlier today on FB by WPRI 12: https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=2437137913253668Read the letter at http://neari.org/Community/Return-to-School-2020


WJAR Channel 10: ‘We have to keep people safe’: Warwick School Committee defends distance learning vote

WARWICK, R.I. (WJAR) — Warwick’s School Committee chairwoman stood her ground Wednesday, defending a 4 -1 vote to start the school year with distance learning.

“We have to keep people safe and alive,” said Karen Bachus. “One death is one death too many.”

At her weekly press briefing Wednesday, Gov. Gina Raimondo had harsh words for the school committee members, who took the vote at a monthly meeting Tuesday.

“They just threw in the towel on those kids and I think the children of Warwick deserve better,” the governor said.

Warwick schools, the state’s third-largest district, submitted several re-opening plans to the state, but none included a full, in-person learning scenario.

Bachus said that option was not feasible for the district, due to issues with space, cash and poor air circulation. She estimated it would cost about $15 million to hire more staff and purchase enough cleaning supplies in order to bring students back safely.

Read more here.


RICOSH FaceBook Zoom Event




AFT Voices: Support staff are the infrastructure of the world

During this pandemic, it has become very obvious who the essential workers are. Let me be clear. I am not criticizing mayors, university presidents or school superintendents. But amid the COVID-19 contagion, we would be nowhere without custodians, paraprofessionals, food service workers, administrative assistants and school bus drivers. School and college tech support workers alone have kept networks connected and students engaged in their studies, and they will become ever more important as we reopen schools.

In the United States, 370,000 school and college support staff who belong to my union, the American Federation of Teachers, joined their peers around the world in stepping up to face this public health crisis. They have cooked, assembled and delivered millions of meals; deep-cleaned schools and universities; ordered and distributed supplies; tutored; provided reading support and physical education online; conducted virtual study halls; and driven mobile hotspots to our most vulnerable children. They have risked their lives — and some have died — doing their jobs.

Read more here.


Bloomberg: Do-It-Yourself Contact Tracing for 1.3 Million: A Union Jumps In

The United Food and Commercial Workers International Union is stepping in where the government has failed, running its own coronavirus contact-tracing program for 1.3 million members.

Since the Covid-19 outbreak hit, the union has sent agents into grocery stores, meatpacking plants and food-processing facilities. They talk to workers and comb work schedules to figure out who might have been exposed. Then, they notify the employer’s human resources department and direct workers to free testing sites, some provided by the union.

The program fills a void left by the Trump administration, which has failed to create a national test-and-trace regimen — and is an active advertisement for a labor movement that’s been waning for decades. Local health departments, which usually perform the function, have been overwhelmed by a disease that has sickened more than 4.8 million Americans and killed more than 158,000. And in any event, testing delays make contact tracing impractical in many areas.

In such disarray, workers must fend for themselves, said Marc Perrone, international president of the union. Read more here.


People’s World: Letter Carriers union files nationwide grievance against mail slowdown scheme

WASHINGTON—The Letter Carriers union has filed a national grievance, an unusual move, against Postmaster General Louis DeJoy, who took over the agency, promptly fired 21-31 top staffers, and imposed shutdown actions and an overtime ban that slows the mail down.

The union’s grievance, which also demands mandated talks over DeJoy’s moves, comes just after 84 lawmakers from both parties wrote to him denouncing the shutdowns and work ban, and as House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., blasted DeJoy’s schemes in a weekend press conference via Zoom.

And Rep. Gerry Connolly, D-Va., chair of a House subcommittee that deals with postal service legislation, tweeted DeJoy’s slowdown scheme “is absolutely an attempt to interfere with the (November) election.”

“One way to suppress (mail-in) votes is to slow down delivery of the mail,” Connolly tweeted.

“NALC initiated a national-level grievance regarding the Postal Service’s unilateral implementation of the delivery initiative test called Expedited Street/Afternoon Sortation (ESAS),” union President Fredric Rolando’s formal legal filing said. Read more here.


Voice of Labor:


UPCOMING EVENTS:

Register here



For more information visit Website.


CORONAVIRUS COVID-19 RESOURCES

You can find some helpful resources on our website.

Share this link: https://rhodeislandaflcio.org/coronavirus-covid-19


Are you following Rhode Island AFL-CIO on Social Media? Click on the links below.

FaceBook: @riaflcio

Twitter: @riaflcio

Visit our website RhodeIslandAFLCIO.org for more information, news and events.



THIS WEEK IN LABOR HISTORY

Voices in Labor:

Cesar Chavez was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Bill Clinton, becoming the first Mexican-American ever to receive the honor. Chavez co-founded the Nation Farm Workers Association (later the United Farm Workers union, UFW) in 1962. His public-relations approach to unionism and aggressive but nonviolent tactics made the farm workers’ struggle a moral cause with nationwide support. – 1994

The Amalgamated Meat Cutters & Butcher Workmen of North America merge with the Retail Clerks International Union to become United Food & Commercial Workers. – 1979

The International Longshoremen’s and Warehousemen’s Union received a Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO) charter. – 1937

A 58-hour walkout by 73,000 Bell Atlantic workers from 13 states ended in victory. – 1998

Learn more


Now showing on Labor Vision

The Labor Vision at Home Edition continues. Check out the latest episodes on our website: www.LaborVisionRI.org.

Never miss a segment. Like us on Facebook (@LaborVisionRI), follow us on Instagram and Twitter, and subscribe to our YouTube page (LaborVisionTV1).


Cox Channel 14 & FIOS Channel 33
Tuesday @ 7pm
Thursday @ 8pm
Saturday @ 5pm
                               
More Info on Labor Vision:                                    
Website: http://www.LaborVisionRI.org                          
FaceBook: @LaborVisionRI                                                    
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YouTube: LaborVisionTV1

E-News: August 6, 2020

An updated Union Directory listing union goods and services in R.I. can be found on our website at www.RhodeIslandAFLCIO.org under the “Resources” tab.

Here is the direct link—-> Union Directory

Please use this directory to find where you can buy union and use services in Rhode Island.


Fired Tiverton teacher Amy Mullen gets her job back after judge’s ruling

“Never once was her teaching called into question,” U.S. District Court Chief Justice John J. McConnell Jr. said.

Amy Mullen has her job back with the Tiverton School Department.

U.S. District Court Chief Justice John J. McConnell Jr., ruling on a preliminary injunction Friday morning, said Mullen’s First Amendment rights were violated when she was terminated from her teaching job April 15 for speaking up about wanting to discuss distance learning as it pertained to her member teachers. Mullen is head of the teachers union.

In granting the preliminary injunction filed by attorney Elizabeth Wiens, the judge ordered that Mullen “be restored as a teacher until further notice. No doubt Ms. Mullen was retaliated against because of her First Amendment speech,” McConnell said from the bench at the end of a virtual hearing.

“Never once was her teaching called into question” in the 25 years Mullen has worked for the district as a special education teacher, McConnell said, adding that she is considered “an exemplary teacher.” Read more here.


Nursing-home union calls off strike after Raimondo intervenes

The union representing workers at five Rhode Island nursing homes has postponed a strike indefinitely after Gov. Gina Raimondo urged them to hold off and pledged to work on staffing legislation the union favors.

Workers at Charlesgate Nursing Center in Providence, Bannister Center in Providence, Genesis Pawtucket Center, Hopkins Manor in North Providence and Genesis Greenville had planned to go on strike Aug. 5. In a letter Thursday, Raimondo urged SEIU Healthcare 1199NE to postpone any strike and said she was “fully committed” to working on staffing issues and developing a minimum-staffing standard.

The union wants Rhode Island to pass legislation that would mandate 4.1 hours of resident care a day in nursing homes. Raimondo said July 22 that she favored the legislation, which passed the Senate but did not pass the House.

“My office is fully committed to working with the Legislature and the leadership of SEIU District 1199 to reach a fair resolution of the staffing issues you have raised and to develop a minimum staffing standard,” Raimondo said in her letter.

Raimondo had previously urged the unions not to go on strike, pointing to the crisis that nursing homes face right now with the coronavirus pandemic.

After her letter Thursday, the union agreed.Read more here


LHSFNA Plays Critical Role in First-in-Nation COVID-19 Standard

On July 15th, with COVID-19 cases spiking in many parts of the country, Virginia became the first state in the nation to adopt an emergency temporary standard (ETS) to protect workers from COVID-19. The Fund is proud to share that our own Travis Parsons, Associate Director of Occupational Safety and Health, played a large role in pushing the ETS forward and ultimately voting to adopt the standard. Travis has served as a member of the Virginia Department of Labor and Industry’s (DOLI) Safety and Health Codes Board since 2014 and is a former chair of the Board.

“In adopting this emergency standard, the state of Virginia sent a clear message that workers are its most important resource, and that protecting their health and safety must come first,” says LIUNA General Secretary-Treasurer and LHSFNA Labor Co-Chairman Armand E. Sabitoni. “The Fund commends the work that went into this standard, which not only ensures stronger protections for workers in Virginia, but also sets a precedent that other states and federal OSHA may soon follow.”

As we covered in our July issue, public health groups and labor groups have repeatedly called on federal OSHA to issue an ETS for COVID-19. A federal standard would also compel state-run OSHA programs to adopt similar measures. Thus far, federal OSHA has only issued guidance, leaving further action up to individual states.

The Path to an Emergency Temporary Standard in Virginia

The push for an ETS began in May with an executive order signed by Governor Ralph Northam that directed DOLI to draft a standard to prevent and mitigate the spread of COVID-19 in the workplace. The Safety and Health Codes Board would determine what went into that standard.Read more here.


View Pictures


Yahoo Finance: Millions of American workers lost health insurance as coronavirus pandemic worsened

Millions of Americans have lost employer-sponsored health care coverage since the coronavirus pandemic hit the U.S., causing a recession and widespread job losses.

Nearly half of all Americans receive their health insurance through their employer. And amid coronavirus layoffs, some states have seen a massive uptick in the number of uninsured adults.” data-reactid=”17″>Nearly half of all Americans receive their health insurance through their employer. And amid coronavirus layoffs, some states have seen a massive uptick in the number of uninsured adult

According to a report by Families USA, a non-profit public health organization, nine states and the District of Columbia have more than a 30% increase in the number of uninsured from February to May 2020, compared to 2018. Overall, the percentage increase of uninsured in the U.S. is at 21%, with 5.3 million people losing health care coverage between February and May.

Massachusetts saw a 93% increase in the number of uninsured adults compared to 2018. Next highest was Hawaii at 72%. The state relies heavily on tourism, an industry that’s been devastated by the pandemic due to travel restrictions put in place across the world.

Rhode Island and Michigan followed at 55% and 46% respectively. Michigan was among the states that was hit by the virus early on and had to implement stay-at-home orders before most other states because of the high case count. Read more here.



3 key reasons to continue construction training even amid the pandemic

Historically, companies will do two things when times get tough: They will curtail their training departments and sales departments.

The world was not prepared for the coronavirus, and there is no denying companies are facing hard decisions. Some companies have been required to do reduction in workforce because projects have been delayed.

Although halting training may be fiscally understandable, it’s short-sighted and hurts your program and the construction industry as a whole in the long run. This is the time to really focus on projects that are going and ensure people are working at their maximum capacity.

Proactive, successful companies have historically managed to maintain training through difficult times. It may not look the same and may be adapted, but progressive companies will not quit training. Why?  Read more here.


AFL-CIO:


UPCOMING EVENTS:

Zoom Event: RI Committee on Occupational Safety and Health Worker Safety & Health in the Age of Covid-19 Update

Date: Wednesday, August 12

Time: 4 – 5:30 p.m.

Our response to COVID-19 is constantly evolving. This program will address some of the new directions that current research and guidance is proposing to address the occupational threat from SARs-CoV-2 and the disease it causes, COVID-19.

Register in advance for this meeting:

https://aflcio.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJAvcu2urTkuGNURcfMyE8uMDYue3Y3LAy5B

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

###

Register here



For more information visit Website.


CORONAVIRUS COVID-19 RESOURCES

You can find some helpful resources on our website.

Share this link: https://rhodeislandaflcio.org/coronavirus-covid-19


Are you following Rhode Island AFL-CIO on Social Media? Click on the links below.

FaceBook: @riaflcio

Twitter: @riaflcio

Visit our website RhodeIslandAFLCIO.org for more information, news and events.



THIS WEEK IN LABOR HISTORY

Voices in Labor:

The International Brotherhood of Teamsters, led by President Ron Carey, went on strike at UPS. Involving 185,000 IBT members, the strike effectively shut down UPS operations for 16 days and cost UPS hundreds of millions of dollars. This victory for the union resulted in a new contract that increased wages, secured their existing benefits and gave increased job security. – 1997

The Amalgamated Association of Iron and Steel Workers is formed. It partnered with the Steel Workers Organizing Committee, CIO in 1935; both organizations disbanded in 1942 to form the new United Steelworkers. – 1876

The American Federation of Musicians began a strike against the major American recording companies in a fight over royalty payments.  Decca Records settled with the union after one year, followed shortly by Capitol Records, while Victor and Columbia Records held out for another year before agreeing to the union’s terms.  The strike did not affect musicians performing on live radio shows or in concerts. – 1942

Learn more


Now showing on Labor Vision

The Labor Vision at Home Edition continues. Check out the latest episodes on our website: www.LaborVisionRI.org.

Never miss a segment. Like us on Facebook (@LaborVisionRI), follow us on Instagram and Twitter, and subscribe to our YouTube page (LaborVisionTV1).


Cox Channel 14 & FIOS Channel 33
Tuesday @ 7pm
Thursday @ 8pm
Saturday @ 5pm
                               
More Info on Labor Vision:                                    
Website: http://www.LaborVisionRI.org                          
FaceBook: @LaborVisionRI                                                    
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Instagram: LaborVisionRI
YouTube: LaborVisionTV1

e-news: July 30, 2020

An updated Union Directory listing union goods and services in R.I. can be found on our website at www.RhodeIslandAFLCIO.org under the “Resources” tab.

Here is the direct link—-> Union Directory

Please use this directory to find where you can buy union and use services in Rhode Island.


Rally Today


ABC 6 News: Strike ‘not off the table’ for Cumberland school bus drivers

CUMBERLAND, R.I. (WLNE) – Bus drivers with Durham School Services in Cumberland are hoping to negotiate a contract that includes a Covid-19 safety plan before the school year starts.

Representatives with Union UFCW Local 328 tell ABC 6 the drivers have been working without a contract for almost a year.

In a letter to Durham School Services, local and state officials in Cumberland urged the company to come to the table with the union to work out a contract. Here we are about five or six weeks before the opening of school. We have so many obstacles we have to conquer in light of Covid-19 and certainly busing is one of them,” said Cumberland Town Council President Craig Dwyer.

The drivers have been working without a contract for several months. A union representative through UFCW Local 328 tells ABC 6 they’ve been unsuccessful in getting the company to meet with them.

“There’s many many safety issues to discuss based on the facts of what’s going on,” said Domenic Pontarelli of UFCW Local 328. Read more here.


Providence Journal: Some R.I. lawmakers get behind push to rehire food-service workers at T.F. Green

PROVIDENCE — A number of state politicians have signed a petition urging the Rhode Island Airport Corporation to pursue food-service contracts with bidders that commit to re-hiring laid-off airport employees.

About 120 food-service employees at T.F. Green airport lost their jobs when travel largely shut down in March due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Earlier this month, the airport corporation put out a request for proposals, seeking two additional restaurant operators to serve the airport as travel starts to pick up again.

The airport corporation, a state agency, has said that it will favor respondents that agree to hire qualified personnel employed by its previous food-service provider, HMSHost. But, in a statement, the airport corporation said that it has not received any pressure or communication from elected officials seeking to influence the request for proposals process.

Many workers were outraged when the airport corporation entered into a speedy no-bid contract with Dunkin’ at the end of June when its contract with HMSHost expired. Dunkin’ hired four previously laid-off workers out of 12 positions. Read more here.


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Institute for Labor Studies and Research Newsletter

Read Newsletter


AFL-CIO: Executive Paywatch: 1,000-to-1 Pay Ratio CEOs Furlough Workers

AFL-CIO’s Executive Paywatch report, released today, shows that the imbalance between the pay of corporate CEOs and working people persists as a problem. In particular, the report shines light on the 20 companies with pay ratio disparities higher than 1,000-to-1 that furloughed workers in 2020.

AFL-CIO Secretary-Treasurer Liz Shuler (IBEW) expanded on this new feature of the report:

With the COVID-19 shutdowns earlier this year, we saw many CEOs take salary cuts as a token of their solidarity with furloughed workers. While these CEO salary cuts made for good headlines, they are mostly window dressing. Base salary makes up less than 8% of total compensation for CEOs of S&P 500 companies. Most CEO pay is in equity awards. The real story in executive compensation was that companies ramped up their equity awards to senior executives at the beginning of this year. Meanwhile, millions of working people have been furloughed or laid off due to COVID-19 related shutdowns. This disparity represents a fundamental imbalance in our economy. Working people are being treated as disposable employees. Now these cast-off workers, as a result of COVID-19, are at risk of having their unemployment benefits cut.

The Executive Paywatch website is the most comprehensive, searchable online database tracking CEO pay. Key highlights of this year’s report: See more here.



International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers: Looking Back: The IAM’s Role in the Americans with Disabilities Act

The Sunday, July 26 anniversary of the signing of the 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a good time to reflect on how to empower and support workers with differing abilities that we see and interact with every day, whether we realize it or not.

The ADA is a civil rights law prohibiting discrimination based on disability in employment, government services, transportation and public accommodations. It was signed into law July 26, 1990, but didn’t take effect for two years to give companies, businesses and other facilities time to implement the regulations.

“Every working person deserves access to a job that pays a livable wage with good benefits,” said IAM International President Robert Martinez Jr. “The IAM fights for inclusion in the workplace and in the community, so everyone has improved quality of life with independence and mobility.”

The IAM logo appeared in the movie on Hertz trucks the union rented for travel once the protestors arrived in Washington, DC. Signs on the truck include one that says “Justice on the Job, Security for the Family, Service to the Community” and another that says “Support California handicapped.”  Read more here.


Labor 411: Ethical Camping Essentials Shopping List

The Coronavirus pandemic has scuttled most of the country’s summer vacation plans, but camping is still a safe option for many of us. As you pack up the RV and take to the road – or maybe the backyard – for an encounter with the great outdoors, remember that not all camping essentials are created equal. The products listed below are made by companies who treat their workers fairly and give them a voice on the job.

Enjoy your time outdoors, stay safe and let’s all work to build a stronger America.

See List



UPCOMING EVENTS:

RALLY & UPCOMING STRIKES

Rally: Thursday, August 6 at the State House at Noon

Frontline Health Care Heroes at five nursing homes plan to go on strike for better staffing for their residents and living wage for their co-workers. Caregivers have put their families at risk by caring for the most frail Rhode Islanders in nursing homes, yet many still cannot afford to take care of their own families.

1199 SEIU is asking for solidarity from Union sisters and brothers with striking Nursing Home Workers. Picketing will practice social distancing. Food plans look different, not family style, food must be individually packaged (boxed lunches or breakfasts, individually wrapped snacks, single serving drinks, canned food donations). Disinfectant wipes, hand sanitizer, gloves, masks are welcome. Banners of locals are encouraged.

The 3-Day Strikes are planned from Weds, August 5, Thursday, August 6 and Friday August 7 (7am to 7pm):

The location of the strikes are:

Bannister Center (135 Dodge St., Providence)

Charlesgate Nursing Home (100 Randall St., Providence)
Greenville Center (735 Putnam Pike, Greenville)

Hopkins Manor (610 Smithfield Road., North Providence)
Pawtucket Center (70 Gill Ave, Pawtucket)

Please let 1199 SEIU know before the strike which venue your union would participate in. Contact Emmanuel at 440-9675 or Emmanuel@RISEIU.org

###

Register here



For more information visit Website.


CORONAVIRUS COVID-19 RESOURCES

You can find some helpful resources on our website.

Share this link: https://rhodeislandaflcio.org/coronavirus-covid-19


Are you following Rhode Island AFL-CIO on Social Media? Click on the links below.

FaceBook: @riaflcio

Twitter: @riaflcio

Visit our website RhodeIslandAFLCIO.org for more information, news and events.



THIS WEEK IN LABOR HISTORY

Voices in Labor:

The U.S. minimum wage increased to $6.55 per hour. The original minimum, set in 1938 by the Fair Labor Standards Act, was 25 cents per hour. – 2008

The U.S. minimum wage rose to $7.25 per hour, up from $6.55. – 2009

The Teamsters and Service Employees unions break from the AFL-CIO during the federation’s 50th convention to begin the Change to Win coalition, ultimately comprised of seven unions. They said they wanted more emphasis on organizing and less on electoral politics. – 2005

The Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) took effect. It required employers to offer reasonable accommodations to qualified disabled employees and banned discrimination against such workers. – 1992

Learn more


Now showing on Labor Vision

The Labor Vision at Home Edition continues. Check out the latest episodes on our website: www.LaborVisionRI.org.

Never miss a segment. Like us on Facebook (@LaborVisionRI), follow us on Instagram and Twitter, and subscribe to our YouTube page (LaborVisionTV1).


Cox Channel 14 & FIOS Channel 33
Tuesday @ 7pm
Thursday @ 8pm
Saturday @ 5pm
                               
More Info on Labor Vision:                                    
Website: http://www.LaborVisionRI.org                          
FaceBook: @LaborVisionRI                                                    
Twitter: @LaborVisionRI                                                        
Instagram: LaborVisionRI
YouTube: LaborVisionTV1

e-news: july 23, 2020

An updated Union Directory listing union goods and services in R.I. can be found on our website at www.RhodeIslandAFLCIO.org under the “Resources” tab.

Here is the direct link—-> Union Directory

Please use this directory to find where you can buy union and use services in Rhode Island.


Listen to Emmanuel Falck of SEIU, Local 1199 talk about the need for safe staffing in nursing homes.

Watch Video


Rally for Our Residents’ Lives — TODAY!

Last week the State Senate voted UNANIMOUSLY to pass the Nursing Home Staffing & Quality Care Act (S-2519 Senate Whip Goodwin) for safe staffing for nursing home residents and living wage for caregivers.

The Senate passed the bill, Governor Raimondo and the Department of Health came out in support of the legislation. Now it is time for the House of Representatives to take action.

Now this bill moves over to the House of Representatives. We need to make sure the House hears from us why Rhode Island seniors, people with disabilities and caregivers need safe staffing NOW. The urgency to end short staffing grows by the day – just this week, hundreds of nursing home workers issued strike notices; now more than ever we need the legislature to take action to avert a strike.

We need to tell our State House of Reps they can’t stop until they end Rhode Island’s deadly nursing home status quo, once and for all.

For more information and to sign-up, go here.


Pictures from last week’s SEIU, Local 1199 Rally

View Pictures


Providence Journal: Raimondo still favors in-person learning, but pledges Aug. 31 school reopening will be based on science

“I’m not willing to say it’s safer to keep kids at home because I don’t know if that’s true,” the governor said.

PROVIDENCE — Gov. Gina Raimondo doubled down on her commitment to return to in-person learning Wednesday, but promised that any decision about school reopening will be based on the latest scientific data.

During her weekly COVID-19 press conference, Raimondo said it’s too soon to say exactly how schools will reopen Aug. 31, but said it’s important for districts to have different scenarios depending on the prevalence of the virus.

“I’m not willing to say it’s safer to keep kids at home because I don’t know if that’s true,” she said. “Our children are suffering nutritionally, intellectually, emotionally. Mental health issues are through the roof. To be honest, I worry the most about children who live in poverty, for whom distance learning was a challenge. It’s way too early to throw in the towel.”

Nationally and locally, opposition has been growing against reopening brick and mortar buildings. A number of large school districts, from Los Angeles to Prince Georges County in Maryland, have opted not to reopen in person.

Read more


UFCW Local 328

Why has @DurhamSchoolsSvc refused to negotiate for the entire month of July? Why have they only agreed to one date in August? Durham needs to act with a sense of urgency that RI families deserve to address concerns which impact safety & service.


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Rhode Island Committee on Occupational Safety and Health Summer Newsletter

Read Newsletter



Modern Retail: The pandemic has exacerbated differences between unionized and non-unionized retail workers

When Macy’s refused to take workers’ temperatures at its White Plains outlet, a union stepped in. After the department store chain announced it would only be making the checks mandatory at more highly trafficked stores, members of the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union (RWDSU) stood outside the White Plains outlet, taking workers’ temperatures as they entered the store.

Eventually, the retailer caved: “we embarrassed Macy’s, and forced Macy’s to pick up their safety protocol at all the stores whose workers we represent,” said Stuart Appelbaum, the RWDSU president.

Since the start of the pandemic, unions have helped bolster safety protocols for retail workers, given them support to push back on decisions that put them at risk, and allowed them more influence over decisions that impact them directly. In some cases, Appelbaum said, the RWDSU and other unions were able to negotiate higher pay, better severance, and additional benefits such as paid time off to allow workers to quarantine or recover from illness, where necessary. After grocery store chains axed additional hazard “hero pay,” for instance, a union outcry resulted in additional one-off bonuses for workers at Kroger.
Read more



UPCOMING EVENTS:

Register here



For more information visit Website.


CORONAVIRUS COVID-19 RESOURCES

You can find some helpful resources on our website.

Share this link: https://rhodeislandaflcio.org/coronavirus-covid-19


Are you following Rhode Island AFL-CIO on Social Media? Click on the links below.

FaceBook: @riaflcio

Twitter: @riaflcio

Visit our website RhodeIslandAFLCIO.org for more information, news and events.



THIS WEEK IN LABOR HISTORY

Voices in Labor:

New York City newsboys, many so poor that they were sleeping in the streets, began a two-week strike. Several rallies drew more than 5,000 newsboys, complete with charismatic speeches by strike leader Kid Blink, who was blind in one eye. The boys had to pay publishers up front for the newspapers. The strike lasted two weeks, causing Pulitzer’s New York World to reduce its circulation from 360,000 to 125,000. The strike was successful in increasing the amount of money newsboys received for their work and in forcing the publishers to buy back unsold papers. – 1899

The first labor contract in the history of the federal government was signed by postal unions and the Postal Service following an unauthorized strike by 200,000 postal workers the year before. – 1971

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Now showing on Labor Vision

Erica Hammond sits down with members of the UFCW Local 328 negotiating committee, including Patricia St. Pierre, Ashley Cox, Vince Auger, Sam Marvin and Domenic Pontarelli to discuss the contract battle they’ve been locked in with Durham School Services in the Cumberland district; and how an unsettled labor situation could throw the district’s transportation plans into disarray in an already uncertain school year.

Never miss a segment. Like us on Facebook (@LaborVisionRI), follow us on Instagram and Twitter, and subscribe to our YouTube page (LaborVisionTV1).


Cox Channel 14 & FIOS Channel 33
Tuesday @ 7pm
Thursday @ 8pm
Saturday @ 5pm
                               
More Info on Labor Vision:
Website: http://www.LaborVisionRI.org
FaceBook: @LaborVisionRI
Twitter: @LaborVisionRI
Instagram: LaborVisionRI
YouTube: LaborVisionTV1
An updated Union Directory listing union goods and services in R.I. can be found on our website at www.RhodeIslandAFLCIO.org under the “Resources” tab.
Here is the direct link—-> Union Directory
Please use this directory to find where you can buy union and use services in Rhode Island.



Listen to Emmanuel Falck of SEIU, Local 1199 talk about the need for safe staffing in nursing homes.


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Rally for Our Residents’ Lives — TODAY!


Last week the State Senate voted UNANIMOUSLY to pass the Nursing Home Staffing & Quality Care Act (S-2519 Senate Whip Goodwin) for safe staffing for nursing home residents and living wage for caregivers.
The Senate passed the bill, Governor Raimondo and the Department of Health came out in support of the legislation. Now it is time for the House of Representatives to take action.
Now this bill moves over to the House of Representatives. We need to make sure the House hears from us why Rhode Island seniors, people with disabilities and caregivers need safe staffing NOW. The urgency to end short staffing grows by the day – just this week, hundreds of nursing home workers issued strike notices; now more than ever we need the legislature to take action to avert a strike.

We need to tell our State House of Reps they can’t stop until they end Rhode Island’s deadly nursing home status quo, once and for all.
For more information and to sign-up, go here.


Pictures from last week’s SEIU, Local 1199 Rally


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Providence Journal: Raimondo still favors in-person learning, but pledges Aug. 31 school reopening will be based on science
“I’m not willing to say it’s safer to keep kids at home because I don’t know if that’s true,” the governor said.
PROVIDENCE — Gov. Gina Raimondo doubled down on her commitment to return to in-person learning Wednesday, but promised that any decision about school reopening will be based on the latest scientific data.
During her weekly COVID-19 press conference, Raimondo said it’s too soon to say exactly how schools will reopen Aug. 31, but said it’s important for districts to have different scenarios depending on the prevalence of the virus.
“I’m not willing to say it’s safer to keep kids at home because I don’t know if that’s true,” she said. “Our children are suffering nutritionally, intellectually, emotionally. Mental health issues are through the roof. To be honest, I worry the most about children who live in poverty, for whom distance learning was a challenge. It’s way too early to throw in the towel.”
Nationally and locally, opposition has been growing against reopening brick and mortar buildings. A number of large school districts, from Los Angeles to Prince Georges County in Maryland, have opted not to reopen in person.
Read more


UFCW Local 328

Why has @DurhamSchoolsSvc refused to negotiate for the entire month of July? Why have they only agreed to one date in August? Durham needs to act with a sense of urgency that RI families deserve to address concerns which impact safety & service.





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Rhode Island Committee on Occupational Safety and Health Summer Newsletter


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Modern Retail: The pandemic has exacerbated differences between unionized and non-unionized retail workers


When Macy’s refused to take workers’ temperatures at its White Plains outlet, a union stepped in. After the department store chain announced it would only be making the checks mandatory at more highly trafficked stores, members of the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union (RWDSU) stood outside the White Plains outlet, taking workers’ temperatures as they entered the store.
Eventually, the retailer caved: “we embarrassed Macy’s, and forced Macy’s to pick up their safety protocol at all the stores whose workers we represent,” said Stuart Appelbaum, the RWDSU president.
Since the start of the pandemic, unions have helped bolster safety protocols for retail workers, given them support to push back on decisions that put them at risk, and allowed them more influence over decisions that impact them directly. In some cases, Appelbaum said, the RWDSU and other unions were able to negotiate higher pay, better severance, and additional benefits such as paid time off to allow workers to quarantine or recover from illness, where necessary. After grocery store chains axed additional hazard “hero pay,” for instance, a union outcry resulted in additional one-off bonuses for workers at Kroger.

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UPCOMING EVENTS:

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CORONAVIRUS COVID-19 RESOURCES
You can find some helpful resources on our website.

Share this link: https://rhodeislandaflcio.org/coronavirus-covid-19

Are you following Rhode Island AFL-CIO on Social Media? Click on the links below.
FaceBook: @riaflcio
Twitter: @riaflcio
Visit our website RhodeIslandAFLCIO.org for more information, news and events.



THIS WEEK IN LABOR HISTORY

Voices in Labor:
New York City newsboys, many so poor that they were sleeping in the streets, began a two-week strike. Several rallies drew more than 5,000 newsboys, complete with charismatic speeches by strike leader Kid Blink, who was blind in one eye. The boys had to pay publishers up front for the newspapers. The strike lasted two weeks, causing Pulitzer’s New York World to reduce its circulation from 360,000 to 125,000. The strike was successful in increasing the amount of money newsboys received for their work and in forcing the publishers to buy back unsold papers. – 1899
The first labor contract in the history of the federal government was signed by postal unions and the Postal Service following an unauthorized strike by 200,000 postal workers the year before. – 1971
Learn more






Now showing on Labor Vision
Erica Hammond sits down with members of the UFCW Local 328 negotiating committee, including Patricia St. Pierre, Ashley Cox, Vince Auger, Sam Marvin and Domenic Pontarelli to discuss the contract battle they’ve been locked in with Durham School Services in the Cumberland district; and how an unsettled labor situation could throw the district’s transportation plans into disarray in an already uncertain school year.

Never miss a segment. Like us on Facebook (@LaborVisionRI), follow us on Instagram and Twitter, and subscribe to our YouTube page (LaborVisionTV1).


Cox Channel 14 & FIOS Channel 33
Tuesday @ 7pm
Thursday @ 8pm
Saturday @ 5pm
                               
More Info on Labor Vision:
Website: http://www.LaborVisionRI.org
FaceBook: @LaborVisionRI
Twitter: @LaborVisionRI
Instagram: LaborVisionRI
YouTube: LaborVisionTV1

e-news: july 16, 2020

An updated Union Directory listing union goods and services in R.I. can be found on our website at www.RhodeIslandAFLCIO.org under the “Resources” tab.

Here is the direct link—-> Union Directory

Please use this directory to find where you can buy union and use services in Rhode Island.


TODAY —- Nursing Home Picket for Safe Staffing

Time: 2:30 – 3:30 p.m.

Hosted by 1199 SEIU Rhode Island

Last week hundreds of nursing home workers voted on a strike deadline if they are unable to reach a settlement on their contract proposals to achieve safer staffing for residents, fair wages, affordable healthcare and access to training opportunities.

Stand in Solidarity with Nursing Home Workers as they hold informational pickets this Thursday, July 16 from 2:30 to 3:30 pm at Bannister Center (135 Dodge St. in Providence, RI).

There will also be informational pickets from 2-4pm at:

Pawtucket Center (70 Gil Ave., Pawtucket, RI)
Charlesgate Nursing Home (100 Randall St., Providence)
Hopkins Manor (610 Smithfield Road., North Providence)
Greenville Center, (735 Putnam Pike, Greenville)
Linn Health and Rehab (30 Alexander Ave., East Providence
Linkfor more information.


Providence Journal: Hundreds of R.I. nursing-home workers vote to authorize strike

Vote was nearly unanimous, union organizer says; main issue is lack of minimum staffing requirement.

PROVIDENCE — Workers at three Rhode Island nursing homes have voted to go on strike at the end of the month unless their employers agree to hire more staff and provide higher wages and better health-care benefits.

The union representing staff at Genesis Pawtucket Nursing Center, Hopkins Manor in North Providence and Genesis Greenville Center in Smithfield announced the vote on Tuesday.

Adanjesus Marin, lead organizer of District 1199 of the Service Employees International Union, said the vote taken on Monday was nearly unanimous, with hundreds of members in support of striking and fewer than 10 opposed.

The facilities’ managers were notified that if agreements aren’t reached, the workers intend to strike at 6 a.m. on July 29.

“We can’t call people heroes while we keep them in poverty,” Marin said in an online news briefing. “We don’t do this lightly, but we do this united.”

-READ MORE


WPRI Channel 12 News: Reopening schools: Teachers have ‘varying degrees of anxiety,’ union president say

PROVIDENCE, R.I. (WPRI) ─ While school districts across the country are making decisions on how to safely resume classes come fall, the countdown is on in Rhode Island with students expected to head back to school next month.

But the head of the Providence Teachers Union, Maribeth Calabro, tells Eyewitness News that even just one child contracting COVID-19 after returning to school is too many and the burden being placed on educators is “extremely heavy.”

Calabro said she, as well as dozens of teachers across the state, are concerned about reopening schools on Aug. 31.

“We have various degrees of anxiety from folks, we know kids want to get back to school, and we know teachers want to get back to school, but there are some grave concerns on teachers parts about safety,” Calabro said.

The state released guidance on how districts can reopen schools come fall, but she believes it goes beyond a new set of rules and restrictions.

“My school has almost 1,000 kids, that’s a lot of bodies,” she said. “Then masking is another concern, making sure kids keep the masks on, and then what about ventilation? Opening the doors and windows?”

-READ MORE



AFL-CIO: AFL-CIO Launches Six-Figure Ad Buy in McConnell’s Backyard, Calling for Passage of HEROES Act July 14, 2020

Today, the AFL-CIO announced a six-figure television and social media ad buy that will blanket the state of Kentucky over the next two weeks. The ad calls on Sen. Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to do his job by passing the HEROES Act to provide long-overdue relief to working people who are suffering from the fallout of COVID-19.

“If Mitch McConnell doesn’t act…budget cuts will destroy the public services we need to recover from the coronavirus,” the ad says. “Tell Mitch McConnell Kentucky won’t be left behind—fund our essential public services now. Pass the HEROES Act.”

The HEROES Act is grounded in America’s Five Economic Essentials, the desperately needed measures to keep working people safe and economically secure. It would save workers’ lives through a federal workplace infectious disease standard. It would include large scale aid to state and local governments and the Postal Service, to preserve public schools and public services and support the teachers, first responders and front-line workers who serve our communities. It would extend the additional $600 a week in unemployment benefits that tens of millions of laid-off workers are relying on and help these workers retain their health care. And it would protect earned pensions and take important steps to keep workers on the payroll. -READ MORE


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YouTube: The History of Labor Unions

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UPCOMING EVENTS:

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For more information visit Website.


CORONAVIRUS COVID-19 RESOURCES

You can find some helpful resources on our website.

Share this link: https://rhodeislandaflcio.org/coronavirus-covid-19


Are you following Rhode Island AFL-CIO on Social Media? Click on the links below.

FaceBook: @riaflcio

Twitter: @riaflcio

Visit our website RhodeIslandAFLCIO.org for more information, news and events.



THIS WEEK IN LABOR HISTORY

Voices in Labor:

A nine-year strike, the longest in the history of the United Auto Workers, began at the Division of Park-Ohio Industries Inc. in Cuyahoga Heights, Ohio. During the strike the company lost nearly $50 million, $34.5 in 1992 alone.  Despite scabs, arrests and firings, UAW Local 91 members hung tough and in 1992 won and signed a new three year agreement. – 1983

Italian immigrants and anarchists Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti are convicted in Massachusetts of murder and payroll robbery – unfairly, most historians agree – after a two-month trial, and are eventually executed. Fifty years after their deaths the state’s governor issued a proclamation saying they had been treated unfairly and that “any disgrace should be forever removed from their names.” – 1921

The Screen Actors Guild held its first meeting. Among those attending: future horror movie star (Frankenstein’s Monster) and union activist Boris Karloff. – 1933

Congress passed first minimum wage law (40 cents per hour). – 1933-LEARN MORE


This week on Labor Vision

In an always timely segment that was taped late last year, clinical social worker, Jill Sypole from Building Futures, sits down with Erica Hammond to talk about the construction industry from the apprenticeship stage through retirement and how injuries are part of the career track and how pain management can lead to opioid dependence, and eventual treatment.

Never miss a segment. Like us on Facebook (@LaborVisionRI), follow us on Instagram and Twitter, and subscribe to our YouTube page (LaborVisionTV1).


Cox Channel 14 & FIOS Channel 33
Tuesday @ 7pm
Thursday @ 8pm
Saturday @ 5pm
                               
More Info on Labor Vision:
Website: http://www.LaborVisionRI.org
FaceBook: @LaborVisionRI
Twitter: @LaborVisionRI
Instagram: LaborVisionRI
YouTube: LaborVisionTV1

e-news: July 9, 2020

An updated Union Directory listing union goods and services in R.I. can be found on our website at www.RhodeIslandAFLCIO.org under the “Resources” tab.

Here is the direct link—-> Union Directory

Please use this directory to find where you can buy union and use services in Rhode Island.



WJAR Channel 10: Stop and Shop ends pandemic pay bump for workers

Whether they call it appreciation pay or hazard pay, the pandemic bonuses for union hourly workers at Stop & Shop supermarkets have ended.

Many employees say they’re still at risk, and they’re circulating a petition to keep the payments coming.

Grocery store workers have been on the frontlines of the pandemic since the very beginning.

Stop & Shop started giving its employees so-called appreciation pay in March — and extended the bonus in April. But the 10% pay bump ended on Saturday, even as the pandemic continues.

Stop and Shop released a statement, saying it wanted to thank its employees for working during extraordinary circumstances.

-READ MORE


UFCW: Pledge to #ShopSmart during COVID-19

Help protect yourself and the workers at your local grocery store

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R.I. Alliance for Retired Americans: Elimination of the Unfair GPO and WEP Provisions of the Social Security Act

The Government Pension Offset (GPO) and Windfall Elimination Provision (WEP) penalize people who have dedicated their lives to public service, including many teachers, firefighters, and police officers, by taking away benefits they, or their spouses, have EARNED.

Why is this important?

To urge all Alliance for Retired Americans members, friends or everyone subject to the GPO/WEP to increase their efforts to make sure the Congress of the United States enacts legislation to repeal the Government Pension Offset and the Windfall Elimination Provision from the Social Security Act.

Sign the Petition


AFL-CIO: Message from President Trumka

With the help of our affiliates, state federations and central labor councils, we undertook a very successful set of nationwide actions for the Workers First Caravan for Racial and Economic Justice last month. The labor movement demanded that the Senate take up and pass the HEROES Act, and we demanded the passage of policing reform legislation. Last week, we saw the postal unions mobilize to demand Congress and President Trump provide assistance to the U.S. Postal Service, which has been financially damaged by the COVID-19 pandemic like so many other essential institutions in our society.

Yesterday, a coalition of unions and community allies delivered failing report cards to the senators who have failed to support the HEROES Act or take any action at all in support of much-needed aid to state and local governments. In the coming days, we will see our affiliates stepping up and organizing events designed to hold all senators accountable for passing strong, comprehensive legislation in the Senate. The labor movement will continue to take strong action and build comprehensive mobilization plans, executable even during this pandemic, that will bring us to victory with the passage of the HEROES Act. We are going to need everyone’s help here, and I know after what I saw with the Workers First Caravan for Racial and Economic Justice that we will be able to count on each other to win this battle.


Opinion by Randi Weingarten, President of American Federation of Teachers

Wall Street Journal: Opinion: Of Course Teachers Want Schools to Reopen

Daniel DiSalvo asks: “Will Unions Let Schools Reopen?” (op-ed, June 30). Of course! The AFT published our school reopening plan in April. We said it isn’t a question of whether to reopen, but how to do it safely. We need the infrastructure and investment to physically distance, stagger classes, provide personal protective equipment and test, trace and isolate new cases. The real question is whether the Trump administration will pay for this, but, knowing money is an issue, Mr. DiSalvo raises the red herring of teacher pensions to try to pit teachers against parents.

The only time pensions have been mentioned during reopening is in the context of senior teachers being offered retirement incentives, because they may be at risk if they return prematurely. We agreed it was a good idea to explore. But to suggest a Covid-19-induced state funding shortfall should be solved on the backs of teachers by denying them retirement security—their own deferred wages—makes an already bad economic situation even worse.

Public pensions play a vital role in stabilizing the economy. They provide access to capital during times of uncertainty, support millions of American jobs, and in 2018 alone contributed $1.7 trillion to output and added $341 billion to state and local tax revenue. Every dollar of state and local pensions generates $8.48 in economic output nationally.

Teachers have played a Herculean role throughout this pandemic; ask any parent whose kids were engaged on a laptop screen for three months. We should stop trying to hurt them and focus on the need to return safely to classrooms. For the economy to reopen, schools must too, but that’s going to require more investment, not less.


TruthOut: Facebook and Its Big Tech Cronies Are Upgrading Their Anti-Union Tools

Recently, Facebook unveiled its new Facebook Workplace, a Slack Connect-like intranet-style chat and office collaboration tool that allows administrators to censor certain words, company spokespeople explained, such as “unionize.” The Workplace program with built-in labor suppression is simply the most recent example that suggests, contrary to stereotypes of open and egalitarian corporate cultures, big tech is not that different from Walmart when it comes to its attitudes towards unions.

The negative reaction to Facebook’s Workplace program announcement was swift and unsurprising, given the phenomenal reach and power of Facebook. The AFL-CIO, the country’s largest union federation, attacked Facebook for presenting itself “as a champion of free speech, yet here it is marketing itself as a way for corporations to suppress the speech of their employees.” It demanded that Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg “personally apologize to working people, pull this tool immediately and conduct a board-level investigation into how this product came into existence in the first place.” Zuckerberg has not yet responded, but Ohio Sen. Sherrod Brown has also written to him, stating he was “deeply troubled” by the platform’s potential use as an anti-union tool.

-READ MORE


YouTube: The Wobblies (Industrial Workers of the World, IWW) documentary

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UPCOMING EVENTS:

No events at this time.



For more information visit Website.


CORONAVIRUS COVID-19 RESOURCES

You can find some helpful resources on our website.

Share this link: https://rhodeislandaflcio.org/coronavirus-covid-19


Are you following Rhode Island AFL-CIO on Social Media? Click on the links below.

FaceBook: @riaflcio

Twitter: @riaflcio

Visit our website RhodeIslandAFLCIO.org for more information, news and events.



THIS WEEK IN LABOR HISTORY

Voices in Labor:

New England Telephone “girls” went on strike for a seven-hour workday, $27 weekly pay after four years’ service. – 1923

The March of the Mill Children, the three-week trek from Philadelphia to President Roosevelt’s home on Long Island by striking child and adult textile workers, was launched by Mary Harris “Mother” Jones. The march turned public attention on the scourge of child labor and energized efforts to end it by law. – 1903

The National Labor Relations Act, also known as the Wagner Act, was signed by President Roosevelt. This statute guarantees the basic right of private sector employees to organize into trade unions, engage in collective bargaining for better terms and conditions at work, and to take collective action including striking when necessary. The act also created the National Labor Relations Board, which conducts elections that can require employers to engage in collective bargaining with labor unions. The Act does not apply to workers who are covered by the Railway Labor Act, agricultural employees, domestic employees, supervisors, federal, state, or local government workers, independent contractors and some close relatives to individual employers. – 1935-LEARN MORE


This week on Labor Vision

The Labor Vision at Home Edition continues. Check out the latest episodes on our website: www.LaborVisionRI.org.

Never miss a segment. Like us on Facebook (@LaborVisionRI), follow us on Instagram and Twitter, and subscribe to our YouTube page (LaborVisionTV1).


Cox Channel 14 & FIOS Channel 33
Tuesday @ 7pm
Thursday @ 8pm
Saturday @ 5pm
                               
More Info on Labor Vision:
Website: http://www.LaborVisionRI.org
FaceBook: @LaborVisionRI
Twitter: @LaborVisionRI
Instagram: LaborVisionRI
YouTube: LaborVisionTV1