Category Archives: Events

ENews: June 13, 2019

Common Ground: Rhode Island Coalition of Labor Union Women notes successful #HelpASisterOutPeriod campaign

PROVIDENCE – Leaders of the Rhode Island Coalition of Labor Union Women (RICLUW) have announced that a recent campaign yielded more than 50,000 menstrual period products that will be used to provide care for 2,000 girls in women of lesser means.

Dubbed the #HelpASisterOutPeriod campaign, the effort was launched in February by the RICLUW with the support of the Rhode Island Federation of Teachers and Health Professionals (RIFTHP), Teamsters Local 251 and the Rhode Island AFL-CIO to raise awareness for women who lack the financial means to purchase menstrual products.

The RICLUW held a press conference with Rhode Island Food Bank Chief Executive Officer (CEO) Andrew Schiff, Jonnycake Center of Peace Dale CEO Kate Brewster and RIFTHP President Frank Flynn to announce the results that will give the girls and women a one-month supply of free products.

Maureen Martin, head of the RICLUW and secretary-treasurer of the Rhode Island AFL-CIO, stated in a press release that: “Every day, girls and women in Rhode Island miss days of school and work because they can’t afford the menstrual products they need. Access to period products and supplies is a matter of personal dignity and it’s a genuine health concern.”

-READ MORE


Huffington Post: The Marriott Strike Helped Grow The Largest Hotel Workers Union

A labor union representing Marriott workers says it’s building off the success of a large strike last year to add new members inside the world’s largest hotel chain.

Nearly 8,000 Marriott employees in eight cities took part in the work stoppages in October and November, under the rallying cry “one job should be enough.” The strike grabbed national headlines and ended with higher wages and better health care for housekeepers and other hotel staff.

Since then, the workers’ union, Unite Here, has won elections at non-union Marriott properties in Baltimore, San Francisco, San Diego and Irvine, California. The four wins have added more than 1,000 new members to Unite Here’s ranks, expanding their footprint within a brand that historically hasn’t been easy for the union to organize.                                                                        

The union’s president, D. Taylor, said the high-profile strike gave them a significant boost in those efforts, allowing members to show non-members the gains they were making in unionized hotels.
-READ MORE


AFL-CIO: Get to Know AFL-CIO’s Affiliates: Fire Fighters

Next up in our series, which takes a deeper look at each of our affiliates, is the Fire Fighters.

Name of Union: International Association of Fire Fighters (IAFF).

Mission:To be a strong representative for our members through collective bargaining; to maintain their health and safety; to provide them with education, training and resources to do their job; and to be politically active in campaigns and legislation in order to make a difference in who gets to have the power that drives the decisions that affect members and the work they do.

Current Leadership of Union:Harold A. Schaitberger serves as the ninth general president of the IAFF. He was a local president and state president before coming to the IAFF to create its political and legislative operation. He was first elected president in 2000. Schaitberger began his professional career as a firefighter in Fairfax County, Virginia.

Edward A. Kelly serves as the IAFF general secretary-treasurer, hails from Boston and was elected in 2016. The IAFF is also represented by 16 district vice presidents who together form the IAFF Executive Board. The union conducts its convention every two years.

Current Number of Members:316,000.

Members Work As:Firefighters and paramedics.

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Escondido Grapevine: Local ironworker Paul Pursley spent 10 weeks at Ground Zero following Sept. 11

Sept. 11, 2001: Local ironworker Paul Pursley spent 10 weeks at “Ground Zero” following attack. His major complaint in the years following concerned his inability to get correct, and affordable treatment due to the csts involved, costs that Congress has yet to cover almost 18 years later. John Stewart gave an impassioned plea for the zillionth time today to help out first responders like Paul Pursley. Rep. Duncan Hunter (R-Vapeville) has lots of time to try to get war criminal Eddie Gallagher released into the general population. As for Hunter’s constituent Paul Pursley, nary a word.

“Ironworkers worked every day,” Pursley said. “We went on 12-hour shifts starting at 6 (a.m.) or 7 (a.m.) The more iron we cut up, the more firemen we could find. But we only found parts; a hand, a leg, a torso, never a complete body. We found parts from 650 people. You thought you would find somebody alive at first, but we never did…

“…I never cut so much steel in my entire life. I hope I never have to again.”

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UFCW: Twenty wonky labor terms every union member should know

Do you know what a shop steward is? What about Weingarten Rights? If you hang around union people long enough, there’s terms that will keep popping up that can be confusing if you’ve never worked a union job before or had much experience with labor unions.

For a longer list, download the UFCW Glossary of Labor Terminology.

AUTHORIZATION CARD

A form voluntarily signed by an employee whereby the employee authorizes a labor organization (Union) to represent him/her for the purpose of collective bargaining. Some cards will also state that the employee desires an election to be held to determine whether or not the Union has the full support of the majority of the employees in the
bargaining unit.

BARGAINING AGENT

Union certified by a government agency, such as the National Labor Relations Board, or recognized voluntarily by the employer, as the exclusive representative of all employees in the bargaining unit for purposes of collective bargaining.

BARGAINING RIGHTS

The rights outlined in Section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act. Rights of workers to negotiate the terms and conditions of employment through chosen representatives. The bargaining agent is designated by a majority of the workers in a bargaining unit.

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Teamsters FaceBook:

Teamsters of the Public Services Division are unsung everyday heros in our communities. These more than 200,000 members of our union provide critical public services through the government and municipalities. They respond to life threatening emergencies, clean our schools, drive our buses, transport our children, provide security in public buildings, care for the elderly and veterans, maintain our roads and support our military. Teamsters work at city hall and in the court system, and perform important services in the community protecting citizens as police, deputy sheriffs, safety aides and corrections officers. In the face of new attacks against collective bargaining rights in the public sector, Public Services Teamsters are stepping up and getting more involved than ever in the union!

📺WATCH VIDEO


QUOTE OF THE WEEK

“Union members know that when working people join together, we have the power to enact incredible change—even in the face of incredible odds.” Rusty McAllister


-SEE LIST


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UPCOMING EVENTS:

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THIS WEEK IN LABOR HISTORY

Unionist:

John L. Lewis dies. A legendary figure, he was president of the United Mine Workers from 1920 to 1960 and a driving force behind the formation of the Congress of Industrial Organizations – 1969

President Kennedy signs a law mandating equal pay to women who are performing the same jobs as men (Equal Pay Act) – 1963

Major League Baseball strike begins, forces cancellation of 713 games. Most observers blamed team owners for the strike: they were trying to recover from a court decision favoring the players on free agency – 1981

Unions legalized in Canada – 1872

Congress creates a Bureau of Labor, under the Interior Department. It later became independent as a Department of Labor without executive status in the Department of Commerce and Labor; in 1913 it became the Department of Labor we know today – 1884

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NEXT WEEK ON LABOR VISION:

In the first half of the program, Pat Crowley of the Rhode Island Labor History Society gives an enlightening lecture on the meteoric rise of the Boilermakers Local 308 during World War II, a local that broke the archaic race barrier in place at the time in order to get the job done for the war effort; but whose selflessness went unrewarded as the war came to an end and the local collapsed as the shipyard disappeared and the international no longer even has a record of them existing. And none of us would know any of this if not for the oral history of the workers and a box of papers left in a local library.

And in the second half of the show, the final award ceremony from this year’s ILSR Dinner, as Andrew Cortes from Building Futures accepts his Eagle Award.

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ENews: June 6, 2019

The Public’s Radio: Scott MacKay’s Commentary: Progressive General Assembly Wins So Far Yield Little Legislative Success

Predicting the fate of legislation in the waning hours of any Rhode Island Assembly session is always a fools’ errand. There are just a few weeks left in this year’s session. Unless things move quickly—which isn’t usually the case on Smith Hill—progressive Democrats will again be frustrated at the outcome of their legislative priorities.

The top priority this year, particularly for women Democratic lawmakers, is winning approval for a measure that would make abortion legal under state law in the event the U.S. Supreme Court overturns the 1973 Roe vs. Wade decision that made the medical procedure legal across the nation.

For nearly a half-century, abortion has been a culture war issue. That it resonates still can be seen every day at the Statehouse, where scores of placard-carrying advocates on both sides lobby lawmakers as the bells chime to signal the start of the daily business.

-READ MORE


Providence Journal: My Turn: Patrick J. Quinn: Don’t fall for Lifespan’s tricks

Women & Infants and Butler Hospitals, along with other affiliates that make up Care New England, have been vital parts of the Rhode Island community for generations. As the executive vice president of District 1199 SEIU New England, I have the honor of representing about 2,400 nurses and other health-care professionals who provide care at those facilities, along with other health-care providers across the state.

You will find no stronger advocate for our patients and their families than the hardworking 1199 members who show up every day to provide the best maternal, infant and mental-health care in Rhode Island.

We are alarmed at Lifespan’s corporate campaign to portray itself as an advocate for Rhode Island health-care workers, patients and families. It is the direct care staff from Women & Infants and Butler hospitals, along with community allies, other unions and health-care reformers, who won the strong protections you’ll find in the Rhode Island Hospital Conversion Act, a national model for protecting patients, workers and communities.

-READ MORE


NEA Today: Labor Movement Comes Back Big After ‘Janus’

In January, Virginia teacher Nicole Loch attended a #RedForEd rally at the statehouse in Richmond. She arrived on a charter bus sponsored by the Fauquier Education Association (FEA), even though Loch had never joined the union—a decision she had resisted for 11 years. “It was a bus full of other educators from my county,” says Loch, a civics teacher at Auburn Middle School in Warrenton.“When I got to Richmond, I saw the power of mobilization and strength in numbers,” she says. “I knew then I needed to join.”

Loch marched and chanted for a mile—from Monroe Park to the capitol steps—where the crowd numbered 4,000. Standing there—holding a sign with the words “I Teach, I Matter”—she realized that many of the 250 FEA members at the rally had been meeting for months to organize their road trip, produce T-shirts and signs, and arrange meetings in the offices of legislators to discuss education policy and funding in Fauquier County.-READ MORE


AFL-CIO: Get to Know AFL-CIO’s Affiliates: Ironworkers

Next up in our series that takes a deeper look at each of our affiliates is the Ironworkers.

Name of Union: International Association of Bridge, Structural, Ornamental and Reinforcing Ironworkers

Current Leadership of Union: Eric Dean serves as general president, a position he has held since 2015. Prior to that he served as general organizer, general secretary, general vice president, president of the Iron Workers District Council of Chicago and Vicinity and numerous positions for Iron Workers Local 63 in Chicago.

Other officers include General Secretary Ron Piksa, General Treasurer Kenneth “Bill” Dean and general vice presidents Marvin Ragsdale, Darrell LaBoucan, Bernie Evers, Stephen Sweeney, Kevin Bryenton, Robert Boskovich, Don Zampa, James Mahoney and Steve Pendergrass.

Current Number of Members: 130,000.

Members Work As: Ironworkers who work on bridges, structural steel, ornamental, architectural and miscellaneous metals, rebar and in shops.

-LEARN MORE


Ford Authority: Ford Executive Chairman Says Labor Unions Saved Ford

While labor unions are blamed for some of the costs that automakers incur, Ford executive chairman Bill Ford said that the labor unions helped to save the automaker when competitors like GM went bankrupt. Ford Jr. says that former UAW President Ron Gettelfinger doesn’t get enough credit for helping Ford to stay viable in it’s “darkest hour.”

The Ford executive chairman says that he sat down with Gettelfinger and told him, “You have to help me save the Ford Motor Company.” Ford Jr. says that he told Gettelfinger that Ford needed help, so it didn’t go through bankruptcy and didn’t need a federal bailout as GM did.

The executive chairman says that the union helped Ford to regain a foothold in the North American market and helped the entire industry get back on its feet. When the economy was bad, and automakers were hardest hit in 2007, the UAW rebalanced its healthcare costs and improved performance in manufacturing plants.

-READ MORE



Vintage Everyday FaceBook:

Various shots of Manhattan skyline, tilt down to show painters on the other side of the Brooklyn Bridge, 1920. The painters lower themselves onto small individual platforms suspended from the bridge frame by rope – no safety harnesses visible, makes your knees go wobbly just looking at it!

📺WATCH VIDEO


QUOTE OF THE WEEK

“If you look back over time, there are periods where organizing surged: In the 1930s and 1940s with industrial unions and then in the 1970s with public sector unions. Another surge is coming. It’s right there for the taking. So, let’s take it! With bold, collective leadership, we’ll begin a new successful chapter in labor movement history.” —Secretary-Treasurer Shuler at the AFL-CIO Great Lakes District meeting



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UPCOMING EVENTS:

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THIS WEEK IN LABOR HISTORY

Unionist:

Some 35,000 members of the Machinists union begin what is to become a 43-day strike—the largest in airline history—against five carriers. The mechanics and other ground service workers wanted to share in the airlines’ substantial profits – 1966

Massachusetts becomes the first state to establish a minimum wage – 1912

The U.S. Employment Service was created – 1933

The AFL-CIO opens its new headquarters building, in view of the White House – 1956

Int’l Ladies Garment Workers Union founded – 1900

A federal child labor law, enacted two years earlier, was declared unconstitutional – 1918

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NEXT WEEK ON LABOR VISION:

In the first half of the show, President Frank Sanchez of Rhode Island College sits down with Erica Hammond to discuss Gov. Raimondo’s plan to expand the RI Promise scholarship program to RIC students, and the benefits for the state going forward once the General Assembly approves the measure.

And in the second half of the show, Karen Hazard of Local 808 LIUNA, receives her Eagle Award at the R.I. Institute for Labor Studies and Research annual awards dinner last month.

ENews: May 30, 2019

Providence Journal:

Maureen Martin, president of the Rhode Island chapter of the Coalition of Labor Union Women and secretary-treasurer of the Rhode Island AFL-CIO, speaks at a news conference Tuesday at the Rhode Island Community Food Bank, which received donations of menstrual-care products for women in need. At left is Frank Flynn, president of the Rhode Island Federation of Teachers and Health Professionals. Both unions, and others, helped organized the effort. [THE PROVIDENCE JOURNAL / BOB BREIDENBACH]


For immediate release:

May 28, 2019

PRESS RELEASE:

The Rhode Island Coalition of Labor Union Women celebrates the donation of menstrual products from the #HelpASisterOutPeriod campaign.

The coalition announced that over 60,000 menstrual period products will be donated, providing 2,000 girls & women of lesser means with a month’s supply of free menstrual products.

Providence, RI -The Rhode Island Coalition of Labor Union Women (RICLUW), with the support of the Rhode Island Federation of Teachers and Health Professionals (RIFTHP), Teamsters Local 251, and the Rhode Island AFL-CIO, launched the #HelpASisterOutPeriod campaign in February to raise awareness for women who lack the financial means to purchase menstrual products. Today, the RICLUW is holding a press conference with Rhode Island Food Bank CEO Andrew Schiff, Jonnycake Center of Peace Dale CEO Kate Brewster, and RIFTHP President Frank Flynn to announce the over 60,000 menstrual products they received through donations that will be used to provide menstrual care for girls and women in need.

Maureen Martin, head of RICLUW and Secretary-Treasurer of Rhode Island AFL-CIO, stated, “Every day, girls and women in Rhode Island miss days of school and work because they can’t afford the menstrual products they need. Access to period products and supplies is a matter of personal dignity and it’s a genuine health concern.

-READ PRESS RELEASE

📺WATCH VIDEO


Hartford Courant: Connecticut workers celebrate as $15 minimum wage is signed into law

With the stroke of a pen, Gov. Ned Lamont signed a bill Tuesday to raise Connecticut’s minimum wage to $15 an hour, directly impacting the lives of more than 300,000 workers across the state.

Some of those workers gathered in Hartford and cheered as they watched Lamont sign the bill — at times chanting with other advocates and elected leaders who had pushed for the measure for the past six years. The first increase will be to $11 in October, up from the current minimum of $10.10 an hour, and the minimum wage will eventually reach $15 an hour in 2023.

“We tried and failed a couple of times, and this year we got it done,” Lamont told the enthusiastic crowd gathered in a function room at a nursing home. “As Joe Biden might have said, this is a big deal.”

Business groups said the higher minimum wage will force employers to cut jobs, reduce employees’ hours and speed up automation. -READ MORE


AFL-CIO: Teamwork On and Off the Ice: Worker Wins

Our latest roundup of worker wins begins with women’s hockey players forming a union and includes numerous examples of working people organizing, bargaining and mobilizing for a better life.
Top Women’s Hockey Players Form Union in Pursuit of Pro League: More than 200 of the top women’s hockey players in the world have come together to form the Professional Women’s Hockey Players Association. Among the goals the union is pursuing are a “single, viable women’s professional league in North America,” coordination of training needs and the development of sponsor support. Olympic gold medalist Coyne Schofield said: “We are fortunate to be ambassadors of this beautiful game, and it is our responsibility to make sure the next generation of players have more opportunities than we had. It’s time to stand together and work to create a viable league that will allow us to enjoy the benefits of our hard work.” -READ MORE


AFL-CIO: Get to Know AFL-CIO’s Affiliates: Theatrical Stage Employees

Next up in our series that takes a deeper look at each of our affiliates is the Theatrical Stage Employees (IATSE).

Name of Union: International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees

Mission: To support members’ efforts to establish fair wages and working conditions throughout the United States and Canada, embrace the development of new entertainment mediums, expand the craft, innovate technology and grow the union to new geographic areas.

Current Leadership of Union: Matthew D. Loeb serves as international president. He was first elected in 2008 and has since been re-elected twice. He has been a member of the United Scenic Artists Local 829 since 1989, Local 52 since 1996 and of Local 491 since it was first established in 1994. Loeb was IATSE’s first director of Motion Picture and Television Production. He also serves on UNI Global Union’s world executive board and is president of UNI’s Media and Entertainment Industry sector.

-LEARN MORE


Pacific Standards: Responsive Unions Help Make Work Feel More Meaningful

New research finds that the boons of union membership can extend beyond wages and benefits.

For many of us, meaningful work is an essential component of a fulfilling life. But what, exactly, gives meaning to one’s work?

A sense of vocation—an intuition that you were born to do this—can often do the trick. But what if you’re not lucky enough to find a “calling”? What else can make you feel fulfilled at your job?

New research provides an unexpected answer: a smart, sympathetic labor union.

“We found that when employees perceive their union to be responsive and caring, work meaningfulness was enhanced,” writes a research team led by M. Teresa Cardador of the University of Illinois–Urbana-Champaign. The right kind of union “helped fulfill workers’ psychological needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness,” the team found.

-READ MORE



International Union of Painters and Allied Trade:

Check out the documentary “Bridge Brothers”, which explores the lives of our own IUPAT bridge painters, working on two of Philly’s most important bridges.

Bridges are in decay across the U.S. To Keep these massive structures standing near Philadelphia, union bridge painters risk their lives to restore two of the area’s most important bridges.

📺WATCH VIDEO


QUOTE OF THE WEEK

“After years of grassroots organizing, Connecticut will finally catch up to our neighbors. We applaud the legislature for doing the right thing and raising wages for over 330,000 workers in our state.” Connecticut AFL-CIO President Sal Luciano (AFSCME)


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UPCOMING EVENTS:

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The 2019 George “Bing” Fogarty Memorial Classic Golf Tournament

The George “Bing” Fogarty Foundation was established by the family and friends of Bing to carry on his legacy of charitable works and helping others. Bing lived his life in service of others and quietly helped thousands of people in multitude of ways. This foundation will attempt to carry on those good works by making a difference in the lives of those less fortunate and in need of a shoulder to lean on.

When: Friday, June 7 Where: Exeter Country Club, 320 Ten Rod Road (Route 102), Exeter, RI Time: Registration 7:30 – 8:30 a.m. Shotgun Format: Scramble Cost: $150 to play golf with steak fry; $125 Tee Sign; $250 Corporate/Union Sponsor

For more information: E-Mail BingFogartyMemorial@gmail.com or call (401) 932-3642

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THIS WEEK IN LABOR HISTORY

Unionist:

Animators working for Walt Disney begin what was to become a successful 5-week strike for recognition of their union, the Screen Cartoonists’ Guild. The animated feature Dumbo was being created at the time and, according to Wikipedia, a number of strikers are caricatured in the feature as clowns who go to “hit the big boss for a raise” – 1941

Union Carpenters win a 25¢-per-day raise, bringing wages for a 9-hour day to $2.50 – 1898

Some 12,500 longshoremen strike the Pacific coast, from San Diego to Bellingham, Wash. Demands included a closed shop and a wage increase to 55¢ an hour for handling general cargo – 1916

-LEARN MORE



NEXT WEEK ON LABOR VISION:

After nearly a decade of trying to legislate a solution, Jim Parisi joins Erica Hammond as a guest to explain the history behind the “Continuing Contract,” bill, the court ruling that upset the decades of peaceful coexistence between labor and management before that, and the false narrative some were pushing to try and keep the leverage on the management side during bargaining.

And in the second half of the show, Business Agent Mike Daley of IBEW 99, the first of the Eagle Award winners from the Institute for Labor Studies and Research awards night accepts his award. Congratulations Mike and thanks for your years of service.

ENEWS: May 23, 2019

AFL-CIO: Path to Power Is Clear in the Ocean State

The Rhode Island AFL-CIO has been busy in 2019, leading the fight on a number of important legislative initiatives. There are numerous union members who have been elected to the state legislature and that has provided an opportunity to pass legislation that will make a huge difference for our members and for working people across the Ocean State.

Earlier this month, the state legislature passed, and Gov. Gina Raimondo signed, a continuing-contract bill that would indefinitely lock in wages and benefits in expired public-employee contracts. The law now prevents cities and towns from unilaterally slashing pay and making employees pay more for their health insurance during deadlocked negotiations.

The state federation also was involved in passing a bill that established fairness in the overtime laws to firefighters and relieves them of burdensome shift scheduling practices. A top priority for the Rhode Island State Association of Firefighters/IAFF, the new law sets the overtime threshold at 42 hours per week, bringing firefighters’ overtime protections more in line with other industry workers. -READ MORE


An excellent letter to the editor in the Johnston Sunrise by James Parisi, field representative and lobbyist with the Rhode Island Federation of Teachers and Health Professionals.Johnston Sunrise: Setting the record straight on continuing contracts

To the Editor:

When I read the article in the Johnston Sun Rise in the May 9, 2019, edition about contract continuation legislation, it made me want to both laugh and cry.

I laughed because of article indicates our mayor is considering a constitutional challenge to the contract continuation legislation. I wanted to cry because of the significant misinformation the mayor and the League of Cities and Towns have spread about this issue.

Collective bargaining for teachers exists because of state law, not because of anything in the Rhode Island Constitution. The bill does not take the “constitutional right away to negotiate.” Of course, if the mayor and the League of Cities and Towns want to propose some constitutional provisions to collective bargaining, I am certain I can convince my brothers and sisters in the labor movement to support the cause and amend our constitution to include collective bargaining.

I have lobbied for teachers and school support staff in support of contract continuation legislation for years and cannot believe claims made by my mayor and the League. The legislation preserves the status quo and will not cost the taxpayers one dime. The bill will not have a “devastating effect” because 99.9 percent of the time, when a public sector contract has expired over the last few decades, the contract did not change while the parties have continued to negotiate. -READ MORE


Providence Business News: R.I. Community Food Bank’s donations from Stamp Out Hunger increase 48%

PROVIDENCE – The annual Stamp Out Hunger food drive, in which letter carriers collect bags of food from postal customers, brought in nearly 92,000 pounds of food for the Rhode Island Community Food Bank, a 30,000-pound increase over last year’s efforts.

For the 27th year, members of the National Association of Letter Carriers collected bags of nonperishable food on May 11. In addition to the 92,000 pounds that went to the Rhode Island Community Food Bank, food was delivered to many local food pantries by postal carriers.

“We’re so thrilled with the success of the food drive this year – and with the support we received from the letter carriers and their customers.” said Andrew Schiff, Rhode Island Community Food Bank CEO. “We rely on the food collected during this drive to feed children during the summer months when they are no longer receiving free and reduced-price lunches at school.”

The Stamp Out Hunger drive is part of a national effort that includes the National Association of Letter Carriers, the United States Postal Service, National Rural Letter Carriers’ Association, AFL-CIO, UFCW, United Way, Valassis and Valpak. -READ MORE


RICOSH:

RICOSH HAZARD ALERT

Heat Stress: Can be a Dangerous Companion

Employers and workers need to be aware that heat stress can happen well before temperatures reach official limits for workplace safety. The “heat index” is a measure of how hot it really feels when humidity is taken into account. Traditionally many authorities warn that workers are at risk of heat stress when the heat index reaches 91 degrees Fahrenheit (32.8 degrees Celsius) or higher.

But an analysis of 25 incidents of outdoor worker illnesses and deaths shows that the risk can rise at a heat index of just 85 degrees F (29.4 C). Six deaths happened at heat indexes below 90 degrees F. “Heat-related illnesses can and do occur on days that aren’t particularly hot. An average summer day, with a temperature in the 80s, can fatally injure workers if proper precautions are not taken,” said lead author Dr. Aaron Tustin of the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) in Washington, D.C.“When working in warm or hot weather, take precautions to avoid heat stroke,” Tustin “Don’t wait until the temperature is above 90.”

-READ MORE


Washington Post: Opinion: We need action on infrastructure, not more talk

Thomas J. Donohoe is president and chief executive of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. Richard Trumka is president of the AFL-CIO.

More than half a century ago, Republican President Dwight D. Eisenhower and a Democratic-majority Congress empowered millions of Americans to build an interstate highway system that became the envy of the world. Back then, our nation understood that investment in infrastructure was crucial to creating a better future.

The interstate highway system was such a success that, 60 years later, both parties still fight over who gets credit for it.

Today, our leaders often talk about big ideas but rarely summon the political courage to accomplish them. As a result, our roads, bridges, airports, railways and utilities are outdated and in need of urgent repairs. In 2014, our clogged roads cost $160 billion in lost productivity and wasted fuel. Our packed airports cost nearly $36 billion a year from air travel complications, and our crumbling infrastructure has cost American lives. It should not take another tragedy to change that. -READ MORE


AFL-CIO: Get to Know AFL-CIO’s Affiliates: Farm Labor Organizing Committee

Next up in our series that takes a deeper look at each of our affiliates is the Farm Labor Organizing Committee (FLOC).

Name of Union: Farm Labor Organizing Committee

Mission: To challenge the deplorable conditions of the broader workforce that remains voiceless, powerless and invisible to mainstream America by giving farm workers a voice in the decisions that affect them and bringing all parties to the table to address industry-wide problems.

Current Leadership of Union: Baldemar Velasquez is the founder and president of FLOC. Justin Flores serves as vice president and Christiana Wagner serves as secretary-treasurer.

Members Work As: Farm workers.

Industries Represented:Agriculture throughout the United States.

-READ MORE



Labor 411: Memorial Day 2019

In addition to being an occasion to remember the servicemen and women who gave their lives protecting our nation, the Memorial Day holiday signals the unofficial start of summer. On this busy three-day weekend, grills will be fired up, sunscreen will be slathered (don’t forget!) and time with friends and family will be enjoyed. Not only are the products listed below essential for any barbecue, they’re all made by ethical companies who give their workers a voice on the job. Enjoy the holiday and let’s all grill our way to a stronger America.

**Remember to purchase your food and beverages from Stop & Shop, Shaws and Eastside Marketplace.


QUOTE OF THE WEEK

“Working people are teaching America what it looks like to stand in solidarity with your co-workers. To have dignity and rights in the workplace. To have a voice on the job. To help build an economy that works for all of us, not just the wealthy few.”AFL-CIO Secretary-Treasurer Shuler at the AFL-CIO Southwest District meeting


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Visit our websitefor more information, news and events.


UPCOMING EVENTS:

-Read Press Advisory

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The 2019 George “Bing” Fogarty Memorial Classic Golf Tournament

The George “Bing” Fogarty Foundation was established by the family and friends of Bing to carry on his legacy of charitable works and helping others. Bing lived his life in service of others and quietly helped thousands of people in multitude of ways. This foundation will attempt to carry on those good works by making a difference in the lives of those less fortunate and in need of a shoulder to lean on.

When: Friday, June 7 Where: Exeter Country Club, 320 Ten Rod Road (Route 102), Exeter, RI Time: Registration 7:30 – 8:30 a.m. Shotgun Format: Scramble Cost: $150 to play golf with steak fry; $125 Tee Sign; $250 Corporate/Union Sponsor

For more information: E-Mail BingFogartyMemorial@gmail.com or call (401) 932-3642

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THIS WEEK IN LABOR HISTORY

Unionist:

The Railway Labor Act takes effect today. It is the first federal legislation protecting workers’ rights to form unions – 1926

The AFL-CIO begins what is to become an unsuccessful campaign for a 35-hour workweek, with the goal of reducing unemployment. Earlier tries by organized labor for 32- or 35-hour weeks also failed – 1962

American Labor Union founded -1902

Men and women weavers in Pawtucket, R.I., stage nation’s first “co-ed” strike – 1824

Western Federation of Miners members strike for 8-hour day, Cripple Creek, Colo. – 1894

-LEARN MORE



NEXT WEEK ON LABOR VISION:

In the first half of the show, Jim Parisi of the RIFT and RI Labor History Society sits down with Bob Delaney of the Institute for Labor Studies to describe the upcoming lecture on June 3 at the Teamsters Hall in East Providence of the once 15,000-strong Boilermakers Local 308 that formed during WWII to help the war effort, all while putting aside civil unrest and racial animus at a time when many unions were still very much segregated.

And in the second half of the show, the Leadership for a Future program of the RI Institute for Labor Studies and Research graduation ceremony takes place from the State House senate chambers. Congratulations to all who participated!

ENews: May 16, 2019

WPRI: Raimondo signs union contracts bill, won’t veto firefighter OT

PROVIDENCE, R.I. (WPRI) — Democratic Gov. Gina Raimondo delivered two victories to Rhode Island’s public-sector unions on Tuesday, signing a bill to keep expired contracts in place during negotiations while also allowing a measure on firefighter overtime to take effect without her signature.

Mayors and other municipal leaders had mounted a major lobbying campaign to convince the governor to reject the bills, which passed the Democratic-dominated General Assembly by overwhelming veto-proof majorities. But in the end the labor leaders pushing for the proposals won out.

Raimondo blocked a previous version of the contract-continuation bill back in 2017, but wrote in her veto message at the time that she would be open to signing if changes were made. The governor has recently said she felt this year’s version was different enough to allay her concerns, though municipal leaders have strongly disputed whether the changes are significant.

-READ MORE


Teamsters, Local 251:

For immediate release

May 10, 2019

OWNER OF PROVIDENCE JOURNAL ATTEMPTS TO AVOID OVERTIME PAY LAWS

Teamsters Local 251 Opposes Gatehouse Media’s Efforts to Shirk Responsibility to Its Workers

(PROVIDENCE, R.I.)–Gatehouse Media, the corporate owner of the Providence Journal, has asked the state of Rhode Island for an exemption on Sunday and holiday overtime requirements.

Gatehouse recently filed the request with the Rhode Island Department of Labor and Training. The company had flaunted state wage laws for four years, and the filing is another egregious attempt to milk more money from its workers. Teamsters Local 251 adamantly opposes this request.

Teamsters Local 251 has been in negotiations with Gatehouse Media for a successor collective bargaining agreement since September 2018. The company has yet to agree to any wage increases for the job classifications represented by the union; these include mailers, inserters and machine maintenance employees who work at the company’s Kinsley Street plant in Providence.

-READ MORE


UFCW Local 1445: Macy’s Negotiations Reach Tentative Agreements!

As of May 14, Local 1445’s Macy’s negotiating teams and the company have reached tentative agreements that the teams feel they can favorably present to the Macy’s members for ratification, potentially averting a strike.

The tentative agreements include retaining time-and-a-half for Sundays, reduced health insurance premiums, and good wage increases, with NO GIVEBACKS.

Our Macy’s teams worked 10- and 12-hour days without a break, fighting strong and stubborn pushback from the company, to secure these agreements. “We were determined to make sure our members got the fair contracts they deserve,” said 1445 negotiator Brian Sangster. “We’re the ones who keep the stores running and the customers coming back, and the company needs to acknowledge that fact by giving us the wages and benefits we’ve earned.”


FOR RENT:

Office Space and Support Services available in Cranston

The Institute for Labor Studies and Research is located on 1540 Pontiac Avenue in Cranston, across from the Department of Labor and Training offices. The location currently has office space available in a variety of sizes and shapes that can be rented in the existing layout of modified to meet the operational or space needs of any union interested in renting space. The prices to unions are very competitive and also include the option of accessing the conference and or training rooms of the Institute if they are needed and available by any unions that may be interested in locating their offices at this facility that centrally located. There is a RIPTA bus stop in front of the location and plenty of parking.

Any individual or union interested in more information, please call Bob Delaney at the Institute for Labor Studies and Research at (401) 463-9900.


Machinist Union: IAM Files Charges Against Delta Air Lines for Anti-Union Tactics

Washington, May 15, 2019 – The International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers (IAM) today filed election interference charges with the National Mediation Board (NMB) against Delta Air Lines.

The IAM has overwhelming evidence that Delta Air Lines has interfered with the Flight Attendants and Ramp employees’ lawful right to seek a vote for union representation free from interference, influence or coercion exercised by the carrier.

“The IAM has provided the NMB with evidence showing Delta has run an unlawful, systematic anti-union campaign that includes intimidation, discipline and terminations of union activists,” said IAM General Vice President Sito Pantoja. “Last week, the public was able to see what many behind the walls of Delta have always known; that Delta will go to great lengths to suppress their employees’ collective voices.”

Some examples of Delta’s illegal activity include a coordinated misinformation campaign through postings and electronic messages in the workplace, surveilling and photographing employees participating in union activities and the singling out and termination of union activists. -READ MORE


AFL-CIO: Get to Know AFL-CIO’s Affiliates: Communications Workers of America

Next up in our series that takes a deeper look at each of our affiliates is the Communications Workers of America (CWA).

Name of Union: Communications Workers of America

Mission: CWA members and retirees fight for economic justice and democracy at the bargaining table, on the job, and in the legislative and political arena. They are committed to building a powerful movement that reaches beyond the workplace to build power for working families.

Current Leadership of Union: Christopher Shelton was elected president of CWA in 2015. Sara Steffens serves as the secretary-treasurer of CWA. In addition to the president and secretary-treasurer, CWA executive board includes vice presidents and leaders from seven geographic districts, seven industry sectors, four at-large members and the Canadian director.

Current Number of Members: 700,000.

-LEARN MORE



Richard Trumka, President of AFL-CIO:


Machinists Union: Activate L!VE: Infrastructure Week with AFL-CIO¹s Tom Trotter and Labor Communications with our IAM Basic Communicators’ Class.

📺WATCH VIDEO


QUOTE OF THE WEEK

“We are the most powerful force for working families on the planet. So, we must be a beacon—not just debating the future of work, but defining it. Not just building worker power, but using it every single day.” AFL-CIO Secretary-Treasurer Shuler at the AFL-CIO Northeast District meeting


Are you following us on Social Media? Click on the links below.

FaceBook

Twitter

Visit our websitefor more information, news and events.


UPCOMING EVENTS:

CLUW (Coalition of Labor Union Women) RI Chapter meeting

When: Tuesday, May 21: Refreshments will be served at 4 p.m. and meeting starts at 4:30.
Where: R.I. Federation of Teachers & Health Professionals, 356 Smith Street, Providence
Details: Final planning and organizing for the May 28 rally for the Period Campaign Project. Get involved! New members welcomed. FaceBook

______________________________________________

The 2019 George “Bing” Fogarty Memorial Classic Golf Tournament

The George “Bing” Fogarty Foundation was established by the family and friends of Bing to carry on his legacy of charitable works and helping others. Bing lived his life in service of others and quietly helped thousands of people in multitude of ways. This foundation will attempt to carry on those good works by making a difference in the lives of those less fortunate and in need of a shoulder to lean on.

When: Friday, June 7 Where: Exeter Country Club, 320 Ten Rod Road (Route 102), Exeter, RI Time: Registration 7:30 – 8:30 a.m. Shotgun Format: Scramble Cost: $150 to play golf with steak fry; $125 Tee Sign; $250 Corporate/Union Sponsor

For more information: E-Mail BingFogartyMemorial@gmail.com or call (401) 932-3642



THIS WEEK IN LABOR HISTORY

Unionist:

Jerry Wurf, who was to serve as president of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) from 1964 to his death in 1981, born in New York City. The union grew from about 220,000 members to more than 1 million during his presidency – 1919

Amalgamated Meat Cutters union organizers launch a campaign in the nation’s packinghouses, an effort that was to bring representation to 100,000 workers over the following two years – 1917

Black labor leader and peace activist A. Philip Randolph dies. He was president of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters and first Black on the AFL-CIO executive board, and a principal organizer of the 1963 March on Washington – 1979

-LEARN MORE



NEXT WEEK ON LABOR VISION:

Dr. Okurowski returns again this week in the first half of the program to talk with Erica Hammond about the importance of AEDs (Automatic External Defibrillators) in the workplace, and how having them nearby during a cardiac event can significantly increase a patient’s chance of survival.

And in the second part of the show, a celebration from the State House of the one-year anniversary of the ability of worker-owned cooperatives to do business as a legal entity; brought to us by the members of Fuerza Laboral and their tireless leaders, Heiny Maldonado and Raul Figeuroa. Highlighted are workers from Healthy Planet Cleaning Co-op and several other co-ops from around the state.

ENews: May 9, 2019

AFL-CIO Northeast Council District Meeting

NEARI responds to GOP ethics complaint

For immediate release

May 6, 2019

RIGOP celebrates teacher appreciation week by…attacking teachers

Cranston, R.I. – Today, the RI GOP, apparently prompted by Providence Journal reporter Katherine Gregg, filed an ethics complaint against full-time East Providence classroom teacher, part-time state senator, and National Education Association Rhode Island (NEARI) Vice President Valarie Lawson for supporting and voting for continuing contract legislation currently before the RI General Assembly.

NEARI Executive Director Robert A. Walsh Jr., asked to comment due to Lawson’s union position, stated the following:

“It is sad that the beleaguered RI GOP would use the occasion of Teacher Appreciation Week to attack a hardworking classroom teacher. Like many Rhode Islanders, Val Lawson is active in her profession, her community, her union, and, in her case, she also serves as a newly-elected state senator.

“Val Lawson is a stickler for the rules. She attended the briefing for state senators conducted by the RI Ethics Commission and followed up with their executive director, Jason Gramitt, with questions on this topic. In fact, this matter was so clear-cut that neither the Ethics Commission staff nor Senate legal staff felt that she needed an opinion in writing.

-READ MORE


Checkmate Consulting Group:

National Education Association RI (NEARI) is kicking off Teacher Appreciation Week with a 60 second ad we recently produced that captures NEARI’s commitment – inside and outside of the classroom – to providing a high quality education for every student from every zip code. The star of the ad, 8 year old Avery Morris, is a one-of-a-kind personality and we were thrilled to give her her first acting role. Now get her another coffee milk, please! -Learn More

📺WATCH VIDEO


Thread Reader: @Richard Trumka

Gallup recently put the popularity of unions at 62 percent—a 15-year high.

The @WSJ reported that 2018 was the biggest year for collective action in three decades. Teachers from West Virginia to Arizona. Google employees. Workers in every sector and every region are embracing the transformational power that comes from joining together in common cause.
@MIT mentions found that half of non-union workers would vote to join a union today if given the chance. That’s more than 60 million Americans. The stated purpose of the National Labor Relations Act is to encourage collective bargaining. Yet in the more than 80 years since its passage, every amendment to the law has made it harder for workers to form unions. Today, union-busting consultants are paid tens of millions of dollars to deny workers a voice on the job. And once a union election is won, these same bad actors do everything in their power to undermine the collective bargaining process. -READ MORE


IBEW Media Center: Stay Safe with National Fall Prevention Safety Stand-Down Week

Every year, hundreds of construction workers are killed on the job and more than a third die from falls, the number one cause of accidental deaths in the industry. The tragic loss of our brothers and sisters is made all the more bitter because every death or injury from a fall is preventable with proper training and the use of appropriate fall protection.

From May 6-10, the IBEW is joining with the Occupational Safety and Hazard Administration, the North American Building Trades and the Center for Construction Research and Training for the 6th annual National Fall Prevention Safety Stand-Down.

“This is great opportunity for our signatory contractors to take time for safety demonstrations, training in fall prevention and a review of site safety rules,” said Safety Department Director Dave Mullen.

OSHA spokespeople said they expect thousands of work sites and millions of workers to observe the stand down worldwide in 2019.

-READ MORE


AFL-CIO: Union Made in America Mother’s Day

You have no excuse for waiting until the last minute to find a nice gift for Mother’s Day that also carries the union label. Our friends at Labor 411, the union business directory from the Los Angeles County Federation of Labor, can help you out.

If you want to go the traditional route with some top-of-the-line chocolates, take a look at these from the Bakery, Confectionery, Tobacco Workers and Grain Millers (BCTGM) and the United Food and Commercial Workers (UFCW).
-SEE LIST

**Don’t forget to purchase your gifts and flowers at Stop & Shop, Shaws and Eastside Marketplace where our union brothers and sisters work.


AFL-CIO:


QUOTE OF THE WEEK

“In unity is strength.” —Aesop


Are you following us on Social Media? Click on the links below.

FaceBook

Twitter

Visit our websitefor more information, news and events.


UPCOMING EVENTS:

More Information

_____________________________________________

The 2019 George “Bing” Fogarty Memorial Classic Golf Tournament

The George “Bing” Fogarty Foundation was established by the family and friends of Bing to carry on his legacy of charitable works and helping others. Bing lived his life in service of others and quietly helped thousands of people in multitude of ways. This foundation will attempt to carry on those good works by making a difference in the lives of those less fortunate and in need of a shoulder to lean on.

When: Friday, June 7 Where: Exeter Country Club, 320 Ten Rod Road (Route 102), Exeter, RI Time: Registration 7:30 – 8:30 a.m. Shotgun Format: Scramble Cost: $150 to play golf with steak fry; $125 Tee Sign; $250 Corporate/Union Sponsor

For more information: E-Mail BingFogartyMemorial@gmail.com or call (401) 932-3642



THIS WEEK IN LABOR HISTORY

Unionist:

Nationwide railway strike begins at Pullman, Ill. Nearly 260,000 railroad workers ultimately joined the strike to protest wage cuts by the Pullman Palace Car Co. – 1894

Longshoremen’s strike to gain control of hiring leads to general work stoppage, San Francisco Bay area – 1934

Some 12,000 Steelworker-represented workers at Goodyear Tire & Rubber win an 18-day strike for improved wages and job security – 1997

The constitution of the Brotherhood of the Footboard was ratified by engineers in Detroit, Mich. Later became the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers – 1863

-LEARN MORE



NEXT WEEK ON LABOR VISION:

Dr. Okurowski returns again this week in the first half of the program to talk with Erica Hammond about the importance of AEDs (Automatic External Defibrillators) in the workplace, and how having them nearby during a cardiac event can significantly increase a patient’s chance of survival.

And in the second part of the show, a celebration from the State House of the one-year anniversary of the ability of worker-owned cooperatives to do business as a legal entity; brought to us by the members of Fuerza Laboral and their tireless leaders, Heiny Maldonado and Raul Figeuroa. Highlighted are workers from Healthy Planet Cleaning Co-op and several other co-ops from around the state.

ENews: May 2, 2019

UFCW, Local 328: The final vote of the day! So proud of our union family!

📺WATCH VIDEO


Providence Journal: R.I., Mass. union members vote overwhelmingly Monday to ratify Stop & Shop contract

PROVIDENCE — A week after Stop & Shop employees ended an 11-day strike and returned to work, Rhode Island and Southeastern Massachusetts union members ratified their contract nearly unanimously Monday, and stores seemed to have returned to pre-strike business as usual.

Tim Melia, president of Local 328 of the United Food and Commercial Workers International, said Monday evening that in each of four meetings, two in Foxboro and one each on the islands of Martha’s Vineyard and Nantucket, members of his local stood almost as one to ratify. In the whole day, he said, about four people stood in opposition.

Before each group voted, Melia said, members were briefed on how the new three-year contract differs from the one that expired Feb. 23.

“It came down to, we had to get people back to work,” he said. “There were a few things we weren’t that happy with,” but the union negotiators knew they had some of what they wanted and were close on the rest. “At the end of the day,” he said, “we had to accept this contract, and it was worth bringing back to the members.”

-READ MORE

Providence Journal: Labor-backed bills win R.I. Senate approval

Rhode Island’s public employee unions scored a grand slam at the State House Wednesday when the Senate approved a package of bills vehemently opposed by city and town leaders who say they will leave them defenseless if and when the economy sinks and they have no leverage to bring the unions to the negotiating table.

PROVIDENCE — Rhode Island’s public employee unions scored a grand slam at the State House Wednesday when the Senate approved a package of union-backed bills vehemently opposed by city and town leaders who say they will leave them defenseless if and when the economy sinks — health-care costs soar — and they have no leverage to bring the unions to the negotiating table.

In a series of largely party-line votes, the Democrat-dominated Senate approved bills to: indefinitely extend the key terms — namely, pay and benefits — of expired police, fire, municipal employee and teachers contracts until the two sides agree to a replacement contract; and to mandate the payment of time-and-a-half to firefighters after an “average” 42-hour week. By way of comparison, the federal overtime threshold is 53 hours.

-READ MORE


R.I. Labor History

Marching for worker safety on Workers Memorial Day


The Westerly Sun: Wood River Health solicits donations of women’s sanitary products

HOPE VALLEY — Wood River Health Services is participating in a statewide campaign to collect sanitary products for women and girls who cannot afford to buy them.

The campaign, dubbed #HelpASisterOutPeriod, is organized by the Rhode Island Coalition of Labor Union Women, with the support of the Rhode Island Federation of Teachers and Health Professionals, Teamsters Local 251, and the Rhode Island AFL-CIO.

Campaign organizer Maureen Martin, secretary-treasurer of the state AFL/CIO, said the goal is to raise public awareness of the difficulties women face when they don’t have the financial means to purchase menstrual products.  

“Girls and women missing out on school and work because of a lack of access or affordability of menstrual period products is unacceptable in this day and age,” she said. “If a family is struggling to put food on the table, buying menstrual period products is a huge burden. This campaign is just a baby step towards addressing this issue. No one should have to live in period poverty.”

-READ MORE


Mass LIVE: Unions press lawmakers to pass Janus ruling response

STATE HOUSE, BOSTON, APRIL 30, 2019….The labor community presented a unified front to lawmakers on Tuesday, hoping to convince House and Senate leaders to quickly pass a law to strengthen unions in the wake of the Supreme Court ruling last year that knocked down a union’s right to charge fees to non-members.

AFL-CIO President Steve Tolman told legislators that action was “long overdue” as he sat at a table surrounded by more than three dozen labor leaders to testify in front of the Committee on Labor and Workforce Development.-READ MORE


AFL-CIO: 12 Things You Need to Know About Death on the Job

The AFL-CIO today released its 28th annual Death on the Job: The Toll of Neglect report. Each April, we examine the state of worker safety in America. This year’s report shows that 5,147 working people were killed on the job in 2017. Additionally, an estimated 95,000 died from occupational diseases.

AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka (UMWA) called for action:

This is a national crisis. And it’s well past time that our elected leaders in Washington, D.C., stop playing politics and take action to prevent these tragedies. Instead, the Trump administration is actually gutting the protections we fought so hard to win in the first place. This is unacceptable. It’s shameful. And the labor movement is doing everything in our power to stop it.

Here are 12 key findings from the report:

  1. Every day, 275 workers die from hazardous working conditions.
  2. There is only one Occupational Safety and Health Administration inspector for every 79,000 workers.
  3. Since 1970, there have been 410,000 traumatic worker deaths, but only 99 cases have been criminally prosecuted under the Occupational Safety and Health Act.                                                                             -READ MORE

The American Prospect: The Millennialization of American Labor

On May 4, 1886, thousands of workers rallied together in Chicago’s Haymarket Square to campaign for an eight-hour workday—initiating a tradition of protest for some of the most basic human rights. That was formalized on May 1, 1890, when the first International Workers’ Day was celebrated around the world.

In the 133 years since, workers and their unions have continued to fight for their rights—winning fights 80 years ago to establish the federal minimum wage, secure collective bargaining rights, and even raising wages for non-union workers by setting industry-wide standards. During the mid-20th century when union density was its strongest, unions reduced overall inequality.

But that was then. In the decades since, collective bargaining rights have been under unending attack and it is no accident that union density in the United States has declined to near single digits. Up to 87 percent of private-sector employers fight their employees’ efforts to unionize, sometimes spending hundreds of thousands of dollars to pay “union-avoidance consultants” to bust the organizing drives.

-READ MORE


Boston Globe: Construction industry to workers battling addiction: ‘We want to help’

https://www2.bostonglobe.com/metro/2019/04/28/construction-industry-workers-battling-addiction-want-help/EDez0lAHMvmT98k3n4F94O/story.html

Bryan Snow, an electrician from Peabody, knows about the pain opioid addiction can inflict on a family. The 41-year-old spent years battling the disease, not seeking the help he needed, in part because of attitudes in the construction industry.

Snow, drug-free now for seven years, said the industry must work to encourage those struggling with addiction to come forward to get treatment.

“It needs to be out there: ‘If you need help, you can come. It’s OK,’ ” Snow said.

As soaring numbers of construction workers battle addiction, building trades leaders in Boston are launching a conference this week intended to do just that: show contractors and union members how they can help those who are hooked on drugs and alcohol.

-READ MORE


AFL-CIO:

Our rights weren’t gifted. They were won by workers who refused to accept second best.

Happy International Workers Day!

📺WATCH VIDEO



QUOTE OF THE WEEK

“Despite widespread calls to act—from the people who build our infrastructure to the folks who rely on it every single day; after all of the studies and reports outlining this urgent crisis, and notwithstanding overwhelming public support and outcry for increased investments—no meaningful action has been taken to put us on a course to correct decades of chronic underinvestment.” —AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka’s (UMWA) testimony before the U.S. House Ways and Means Committee, March 6, 2019


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FaceBook

Twitter

Visit our websitefor more information, news and events.


UPCOMING EVENTS:

Northeast District Meeting It’s that time again! Building on last year’s success, we are excited to announce the second annual AFL‑CIO district meetings. Over the next several months, labor activists across the country will come together under the banner: Growing Our Movement—Empowering Our Communities. Northeast District, May 8–9ProvidenceStates covered: Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, Vermont and West Virginia Registration is open. Secure your spot now. Space is limited. In 2018, we had to turn people away once capacity was reached. So please register at your earliest convenience. We are focused on continuing to grow our power through organizing, member engagement, politics and community outreach. Over the two-day meeting, we will be offering a full plenary and workshops. This year, we have added an additional round of workshops to give attendees even more choices. For more information and to register for the AFL‑CIO Northeast District meeting, click here. We look forward to seeing you soon. REGISTER NOW >>>

_____________________________________________

More Information

_____________________________________________

The 2019 George “Bing” Fogarty Memorial Classic Golf Tournament

The George “Bing” Fogarty Foundation was established by the family and friends of Bing to carry on his legacy of charitable works and helping others. Bing lived his life in service of others and quietly helped thousands of people in multitude of ways. This foundation will attempt to carry on those good works by making a difference in the lives of those less fortunate and in need of a shoulder to lean on.

When: Friday, June 7 Where: Exeter Country Club, 320 Ten Rod Road (Route 102), Exeter, RI Time: Registration 7:30 – 8:30 a.m. Shotgun Format: Scramble Cost: $150 to play golf with steak fry; $125 Tee Sign; $250 Corporate/Union Sponsor

For more information: E-Mail BingFogartyMemorial@gmail.com or call (401) 932-3642



THIS WEEK IN LABOR HISTORY

Unionist:

Coxey’s Army of 500 unemployed civil war veterans reaches Washington, D.C. – 1894

An estimated one thousand silver miners, angry over low wages, the firing of union members and the planting of spies in their ranks by mineowners, seize a train, load it with 3,000 pounds of dynamite, and blow up the mill at the Bunker Hill mine in Wardner, Idaho – 1899

The special representative of the National War Labor Board issues a report, “Retroactive Date for Women’s Pay Adjustments,” setting forth provisions for wage rates for women working in war industries who were asking for equal pay. Women a year earlier had demanded equal pay for comparable work as that done by men – 1943

-LEARN MORE



NEXT WEEK ON LABOR VISION:

In the first half of our show, a recap of the Workers’ Memorial Day observance at the site where three construction workers were badly injured in a work-related accident that could have been prevented if the contractors had followed even the most basic safety measures. Great thanks to the Painters and Allied Trades, Fuerza Laboral, CLUW RI Chapter, RICOSH and the RI Labor History Society for hosting and speaking at the event.

And in the second half of the show, Dr. Okurowski of the OEHC of Rhode Island reminds us of the dangers that ticks present. And while the show is a year old, the wet weather this spring has already led to alerts by environmental experts that this will be a bad year for ticks, so please heed what the doctor says about being outdoors this season.