e-news: july 23, 2020

An updated Union Directory listing union goods and services in R.I. can be found on our website at www.RhodeIslandAFLCIO.org under the “Resources” tab.

Here is the direct link—-> Union Directory

Please use this directory to find where you can buy union and use services in Rhode Island.


Listen to Emmanuel Falck of SEIU, Local 1199 talk about the need for safe staffing in nursing homes.

Watch Video


Rally for Our Residents’ Lives — TODAY!

Last week the State Senate voted UNANIMOUSLY to pass the Nursing Home Staffing & Quality Care Act (S-2519 Senate Whip Goodwin) for safe staffing for nursing home residents and living wage for caregivers.

The Senate passed the bill, Governor Raimondo and the Department of Health came out in support of the legislation. Now it is time for the House of Representatives to take action.

Now this bill moves over to the House of Representatives. We need to make sure the House hears from us why Rhode Island seniors, people with disabilities and caregivers need safe staffing NOW. The urgency to end short staffing grows by the day – just this week, hundreds of nursing home workers issued strike notices; now more than ever we need the legislature to take action to avert a strike.

We need to tell our State House of Reps they can’t stop until they end Rhode Island’s deadly nursing home status quo, once and for all.

For more information and to sign-up, go here.


Pictures from last week’s SEIU, Local 1199 Rally

View Pictures


Providence Journal: Raimondo still favors in-person learning, but pledges Aug. 31 school reopening will be based on science

“I’m not willing to say it’s safer to keep kids at home because I don’t know if that’s true,” the governor said.

PROVIDENCE — Gov. Gina Raimondo doubled down on her commitment to return to in-person learning Wednesday, but promised that any decision about school reopening will be based on the latest scientific data.

During her weekly COVID-19 press conference, Raimondo said it’s too soon to say exactly how schools will reopen Aug. 31, but said it’s important for districts to have different scenarios depending on the prevalence of the virus.

“I’m not willing to say it’s safer to keep kids at home because I don’t know if that’s true,” she said. “Our children are suffering nutritionally, intellectually, emotionally. Mental health issues are through the roof. To be honest, I worry the most about children who live in poverty, for whom distance learning was a challenge. It’s way too early to throw in the towel.”

Nationally and locally, opposition has been growing against reopening brick and mortar buildings. A number of large school districts, from Los Angeles to Prince Georges County in Maryland, have opted not to reopen in person.

Read more


UFCW Local 328

Why has @DurhamSchoolsSvc refused to negotiate for the entire month of July? Why have they only agreed to one date in August? Durham needs to act with a sense of urgency that RI families deserve to address concerns which impact safety & service.


View Pictures


Rhode Island Committee on Occupational Safety and Health Summer Newsletter

Read Newsletter



Modern Retail: The pandemic has exacerbated differences between unionized and non-unionized retail workers

When Macy’s refused to take workers’ temperatures at its White Plains outlet, a union stepped in. After the department store chain announced it would only be making the checks mandatory at more highly trafficked stores, members of the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union (RWDSU) stood outside the White Plains outlet, taking workers’ temperatures as they entered the store.

Eventually, the retailer caved: “we embarrassed Macy’s, and forced Macy’s to pick up their safety protocol at all the stores whose workers we represent,” said Stuart Appelbaum, the RWDSU president.

Since the start of the pandemic, unions have helped bolster safety protocols for retail workers, given them support to push back on decisions that put them at risk, and allowed them more influence over decisions that impact them directly. In some cases, Appelbaum said, the RWDSU and other unions were able to negotiate higher pay, better severance, and additional benefits such as paid time off to allow workers to quarantine or recover from illness, where necessary. After grocery store chains axed additional hazard “hero pay,” for instance, a union outcry resulted in additional one-off bonuses for workers at Kroger.
Read more



UPCOMING EVENTS:

Register here



For more information visit Website.


CORONAVIRUS COVID-19 RESOURCES

You can find some helpful resources on our website.

Share this link: https://rhodeislandaflcio.org/coronavirus-covid-19


Are you following Rhode Island AFL-CIO on Social Media? Click on the links below.

FaceBook: @riaflcio

Twitter: @riaflcio

Visit our website RhodeIslandAFLCIO.org for more information, news and events.



THIS WEEK IN LABOR HISTORY

Voices in Labor:

New York City newsboys, many so poor that they were sleeping in the streets, began a two-week strike. Several rallies drew more than 5,000 newsboys, complete with charismatic speeches by strike leader Kid Blink, who was blind in one eye. The boys had to pay publishers up front for the newspapers. The strike lasted two weeks, causing Pulitzer’s New York World to reduce its circulation from 360,000 to 125,000. The strike was successful in increasing the amount of money newsboys received for their work and in forcing the publishers to buy back unsold papers. – 1899

The first labor contract in the history of the federal government was signed by postal unions and the Postal Service following an unauthorized strike by 200,000 postal workers the year before. – 1971

Learn more


Now showing on Labor Vision

Erica Hammond sits down with members of the UFCW Local 328 negotiating committee, including Patricia St. Pierre, Ashley Cox, Vince Auger, Sam Marvin and Domenic Pontarelli to discuss the contract battle they’ve been locked in with Durham School Services in the Cumberland district; and how an unsettled labor situation could throw the district’s transportation plans into disarray in an already uncertain school year.

Never miss a segment. Like us on Facebook (@LaborVisionRI), follow us on Instagram and Twitter, and subscribe to our YouTube page (LaborVisionTV1).


Cox Channel 14 & FIOS Channel 33
Tuesday @ 7pm
Thursday @ 8pm
Saturday @ 5pm
                               
More Info on Labor Vision:
Website: http://www.LaborVisionRI.org
FaceBook: @LaborVisionRI
Twitter: @LaborVisionRI
Instagram: LaborVisionRI
YouTube: LaborVisionTV1
An updated Union Directory listing union goods and services in R.I. can be found on our website at www.RhodeIslandAFLCIO.org under the “Resources” tab.
Here is the direct link—-> Union Directory
Please use this directory to find where you can buy union and use services in Rhode Island.



Listen to Emmanuel Falck of SEIU, Local 1199 talk about the need for safe staffing in nursing homes.


Watch Video


Rally for Our Residents’ Lives — TODAY!


Last week the State Senate voted UNANIMOUSLY to pass the Nursing Home Staffing & Quality Care Act (S-2519 Senate Whip Goodwin) for safe staffing for nursing home residents and living wage for caregivers.
The Senate passed the bill, Governor Raimondo and the Department of Health came out in support of the legislation. Now it is time for the House of Representatives to take action.
Now this bill moves over to the House of Representatives. We need to make sure the House hears from us why Rhode Island seniors, people with disabilities and caregivers need safe staffing NOW. The urgency to end short staffing grows by the day – just this week, hundreds of nursing home workers issued strike notices; now more than ever we need the legislature to take action to avert a strike.

We need to tell our State House of Reps they can’t stop until they end Rhode Island’s deadly nursing home status quo, once and for all.
For more information and to sign-up, go here.


Pictures from last week’s SEIU, Local 1199 Rally


View Pictures


Providence Journal: Raimondo still favors in-person learning, but pledges Aug. 31 school reopening will be based on science
“I’m not willing to say it’s safer to keep kids at home because I don’t know if that’s true,” the governor said.
PROVIDENCE — Gov. Gina Raimondo doubled down on her commitment to return to in-person learning Wednesday, but promised that any decision about school reopening will be based on the latest scientific data.
During her weekly COVID-19 press conference, Raimondo said it’s too soon to say exactly how schools will reopen Aug. 31, but said it’s important for districts to have different scenarios depending on the prevalence of the virus.
“I’m not willing to say it’s safer to keep kids at home because I don’t know if that’s true,” she said. “Our children are suffering nutritionally, intellectually, emotionally. Mental health issues are through the roof. To be honest, I worry the most about children who live in poverty, for whom distance learning was a challenge. It’s way too early to throw in the towel.”
Nationally and locally, opposition has been growing against reopening brick and mortar buildings. A number of large school districts, from Los Angeles to Prince Georges County in Maryland, have opted not to reopen in person.
Read more


UFCW Local 328

Why has @DurhamSchoolsSvc refused to negotiate for the entire month of July? Why have they only agreed to one date in August? Durham needs to act with a sense of urgency that RI families deserve to address concerns which impact safety & service.





View Pictures
Rhode Island Committee on Occupational Safety and Health Summer Newsletter


Read Newsletter




Modern Retail: The pandemic has exacerbated differences between unionized and non-unionized retail workers


When Macy’s refused to take workers’ temperatures at its White Plains outlet, a union stepped in. After the department store chain announced it would only be making the checks mandatory at more highly trafficked stores, members of the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union (RWDSU) stood outside the White Plains outlet, taking workers’ temperatures as they entered the store.
Eventually, the retailer caved: “we embarrassed Macy’s, and forced Macy’s to pick up their safety protocol at all the stores whose workers we represent,” said Stuart Appelbaum, the RWDSU president.
Since the start of the pandemic, unions have helped bolster safety protocols for retail workers, given them support to push back on decisions that put them at risk, and allowed them more influence over decisions that impact them directly. In some cases, Appelbaum said, the RWDSU and other unions were able to negotiate higher pay, better severance, and additional benefits such as paid time off to allow workers to quarantine or recover from illness, where necessary. After grocery store chains axed additional hazard “hero pay,” for instance, a union outcry resulted in additional one-off bonuses for workers at Kroger.

Read more








UPCOMING EVENTS:

Register here




For more information visit Website.



CORONAVIRUS COVID-19 RESOURCES
You can find some helpful resources on our website.

Share this link: https://rhodeislandaflcio.org/coronavirus-covid-19

Are you following Rhode Island AFL-CIO on Social Media? Click on the links below.
FaceBook: @riaflcio
Twitter: @riaflcio
Visit our website RhodeIslandAFLCIO.org for more information, news and events.



THIS WEEK IN LABOR HISTORY

Voices in Labor:
New York City newsboys, many so poor that they were sleeping in the streets, began a two-week strike. Several rallies drew more than 5,000 newsboys, complete with charismatic speeches by strike leader Kid Blink, who was blind in one eye. The boys had to pay publishers up front for the newspapers. The strike lasted two weeks, causing Pulitzer’s New York World to reduce its circulation from 360,000 to 125,000. The strike was successful in increasing the amount of money newsboys received for their work and in forcing the publishers to buy back unsold papers. – 1899
The first labor contract in the history of the federal government was signed by postal unions and the Postal Service following an unauthorized strike by 200,000 postal workers the year before. – 1971
Learn more






Now showing on Labor Vision
Erica Hammond sits down with members of the UFCW Local 328 negotiating committee, including Patricia St. Pierre, Ashley Cox, Vince Auger, Sam Marvin and Domenic Pontarelli to discuss the contract battle they’ve been locked in with Durham School Services in the Cumberland district; and how an unsettled labor situation could throw the district’s transportation plans into disarray in an already uncertain school year.

Never miss a segment. Like us on Facebook (@LaborVisionRI), follow us on Instagram and Twitter, and subscribe to our YouTube page (LaborVisionTV1).


Cox Channel 14 & FIOS Channel 33
Tuesday @ 7pm
Thursday @ 8pm
Saturday @ 5pm
                               
More Info on Labor Vision:
Website: http://www.LaborVisionRI.org
FaceBook: @LaborVisionRI
Twitter: @LaborVisionRI
Instagram: LaborVisionRI
YouTube: LaborVisionTV1