ENews: June 1, 2018

Providence Journal: Deepwater Wind to invest $250 million in Rhode Island to build utility-scale offshore wind farm


Deepwater Wind will invest $250 million in Rhode Island and use a local workforce of more than 800 to build a utility-scale offshore wind farm that would be able to meet the electric needs of 200,000 households in the state, CEO Jeffrey Grybowski and Governor Gina Raimondo announced Wednesday morning.

The investment by the Providence-based company will include $40 million in improvements to the Port of Providence, the port facilities in the Quonset Business Park in North Kingstown and potentially one or more other ports in Rhode Island, where Deepwater would stage construction of the 400-megawatt project that is being called Revolution Wind.

The 800 construction jobs required to assemble and install up to 50 wind turbines for the project in federal waters in Rhode Island Sound would be supplemented by 50 permanent operations and maintenance jobs. -READ MORE


AFL-CIO Press Release: In the Face of Janus, AFL-CIO Launches Nationwide Ad Campaign Calling on Working People to Organize

The AFL-CIO today announced a major, national print and digital ad campaign calling on workers to join together in the face of continued corporate assaults on the freedom to join together in union.

An open letter to working people, penned by AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka, will run in USA Today, the Washington Post and regional newspapers in nine states, including Florida, Illinois, Michigan, Minnesota, Nevada, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin and Massachusetts.

Trumka’s letter offers an urgent call to action: “If you want a raise, better benefits and the dignity of having a voice on the job, we’re saving a seat for you. Join us—be a part of the fight to build a brighter future for you, your family and working people everywhere.” -READ MORE

         


The Herald-News: Taking a different path to a career

Andrew Deangeles took some time away from his welding class at the Wilco Area Career Center in Romeoville to talk about his plans after graduation.

He’s off to trade school on a scholarship. In less than a year, Deangeles expects to have his first welding job for between $30 and $60 an hour. Total post-secondary education debt: $8,000.

“It gives me the skills I need to go not only into a career but the job I choose after seven months, rather than go to a four-year college and have $60,000 in debt,” Deangeles said.

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WITN News: New Postal service stamp honors first responders

The U.S. Postal Service is unveiling a new stamp honoring first responders.

The new Forever stamp will be available starting later this year. It features a firefighter, an EMS worker, and a police officer all racing into action.

Creators say the dark background and smoke are meant to depict the range of situations that first responders face every day. It was designed signed by artist Brian Stauffer, art director and designer Antonio Alcalá and designer Ricky Altizer.

The postal service hopes the new stamp will bring attention to the skill, dedication and uncommon bravery of our nation’s first responders.


Politifact: Is the minimum wage worth less now than 50 years ago?

Sen. Tina Smith, D-Minn., took to Twitter recently to tout her support for a $15 minimum wage.

In the tweet, Smith wrote that “one of the proudest things I did” as lieutenant governor serving under Democratic Gov. Mark Dayton was helping to raise Minnesota’s state minimum wage to $9.50 an hour.

“Now, I’m proud to back a bill to raise the minimum wage to $15 per hour by 2024,” she wrote, referring to a measure introduced by Sens. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., and Patty Murray, D-Wash.

Currently, the federal minimum wage is $7.25, though states can set higher levels if they wish — and a majority do, from a small amount more than the federal level to $11.50 in Washington state. -READ MORE


United Steelworkers FaceBook:

This clip from the USW’s 70th Anniversary celebration relives the “Memorial Day Massacre” that occurred 81 years ago today. Several thousand workers who were trying to form a union had walked off their jobs in what is known as the “Little Steel Strike.” On the South Side of Chicago, striking workers rallied with their families and community members, then marched to peacefully picket Republic Steel. Police, out in full force, fired shots. Ten workers were dead. Thirty others were shot. -WATCH VIDEO



KITCHEN TABLE ECONOMICS

Nearly 15,000: That’s how many nurses, flight attendants, Harvard graduate students, media workers and others organized unions in a single week in April.



AFL-CIO: Union-Made in America Vacation



UPCOMING EVENTS:

DHLNH Workers are on Strike
Ongoing Picket Lines 24/7

 

When: Picket lines are up 24/7
Where: Concord Street, Pawtucket, RI
Details: Couriers and dockworkers work hard for DHLNH. But the company pays poverty wages and denies affordable healthcare to its workforce. That’s why DHLNH workers are on strike in Rhode Island. For almost a year, we have asked the company to be fair to employees, but management refuses to provide fair wages, a secure retirement, or affordable healthcare. Contact Matt Taibi, Secretary-Treasurer of Teamsters, Local 251 for more information at (401) 434-0454, ext. 227.

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3rd Annual George “Bing” Fogarty Memorial Foundation Golf Tournament

When: Friday, June 1
Where: Exeter Country Club
Details: Participate, sponsor, donate raffle prizes and/or donate to the Bing Fogarty Memorial Foundation. Contact Phil Fogarty via E-mail at gphilfog3@cox.net or call (401) 932-3642 for more information. Let’s continue to honor the memory of a “labor giant” and help some well deserved charities in the process.

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CLUW (Coalition of Labor Union Women) RI Chapter meeting
When: Monday, June 4: Refreshments will be served at 4 p.m. and meeting starts at 4:30
Where: Rhode Island AFL-CIO, 194 Smith St. Providence, RI
Details: Get involved. New members welcomed. Contact Maureen Martin at MMartin@riaflcio.org for more information. Website

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Cavalcade of Bands

Hosted Presented by The Providence Federation of Musicians, AFM Local 198-457

When: Tuesday, June 5 @ 5:30 p.m. – 10:30 p.m.
Where: Rhodes -on-the -Pawtuxet
Details: Bands include Arthur Medeiros 16-piece Orchestra, Al Marano Group, Louis Vaughan Group, Angela Bacari/Nicholas King Group, Mary Bogan/Ginny Conley Group, Nancy Paolino & the Black Tie Band and the Bob Mainelli Group. Dancing 5:30 p.m. – 10:30 p.m. Contact Providence Federation of Musicians at (401) 780-6887 for $15 advance ticket and more information. Tickets at door will be $20.

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2018 Big Brothers Big Sisters Night. Sponsored by R.I. Building Trades

When: Wednesday, June 20; BBQ @ 4:00 p.m. and game @ 6:15 p.m.
Where: McCoy Stadium, Pawtucket
Details:  Join R.I. Building Trades at McCoy Stadium on Wednesday, June 20. They have been supporting Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Ocean State for over a decade. Find out how you can become a mentor to a boy or girl. WATCH VIDEO

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THIS WEEK IN LABOR HISTORY

Unionist:

1946 – At least 30,000 workers in Rochester, N.Y., participate in a general strike in support of municipal workers who had been fired for forming a union.

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THIS WEEK ON LABOR VISION:

In the first half of the program this week, President of the RI Building Trades, Michael Sabitoni and his Secretary-Treasurer, Scott Duhamel, sit down with Tim Byrne, Business Manager, of Plumbers and Pipefitters, Union Local 51 to talk about the current projects the trades have working around the state, they’re positive working relationships at the State House and with the Chamber of Commerce to bring more jobs to the area, and the constant commitment of the trades to always include apprenticeships as part of every Project Labor Agreement. .
And in the second half of the program, we continue with the festivities and speeches given by the award winners and graduates the night of the annual ILSR dinner for anyone who may not have been able to attend.